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Cutter Anacapa Sinks Japanese Ghost Ship After Hours of Shelling

By | April 6, 2012

Ryou-un Maru, the derelict fishing vessel sank at 6:15 pm in 6,000 feet of water. Photo courtesy U.S. Coast Guard.

The Coast Guard is watching for fuel and debris from a derelict Japanese fishing vessel it sank off the coast of Southeast Alaska on Thursday.

Kip Wadlow of the agency’s public affairs office says nothing of significance has been found so far. A small sheen was spotted Thursday, but was expected to dissipate quickly.

Wadlow says the Petersburg-based cutter Anacapa began firing at approximately 1:oo p.m. yesterday.

The Ryou-un Maru went down at 6:15 p.m. in about 6,000 feet of water.

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Photos courtesy of the U.S. Coast Guard.

The Japanese vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, starts to burn as the Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa crew prepare to continue firing upon the vessel 180 miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The Anacapa crew successfully sank the Ryou-Un Maru at 6:15 p.m. in 6,000 feet of water. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen.

The Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa crew fires explosive ammunition at the adrift Japanese fishing vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, 180 miles west of Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The derelict fishing vessel sank at 6:15 p.m. after the Anacapa crew used numerous rounds of explosive ammunition. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen.

The Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa crew monitors the Japanese vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, 180 miles west of Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The cutter crew successfully sank the Ryou-Un Maru at 6:15 p.m. by using multiple rounds of explosive ammunition. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen.

The Japanese fishing vessel Ryou-Un Maru burns after the Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa crew fired explosive ammunition at the vessel 180 miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The Coast Guard worked closely with federal, state and local agencies to assess the immediate dangers the vessel presented and determined that sinking the vessel at sea would be the best course of action to help minimize any navigation and environmental threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen.

The Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa crew douses the adrift Japanese vessel with water after a gunnery exercise 180 miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The crew was successful and sank the vessel at 6:15 p.m. in 6,000 feet of water by using explosive ammunition and filling it with water. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen.

The Japanese fishing vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, shows significant signs of damage after the Coast Guard Cutter Anancapa fired explosive ammunition into it 180 miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The derelict fishing vessel sank at 6:15 p.m. in 6,000 feet of water. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon Thomas.

The Japanese fishing vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, sinks in the Gulf of Alaska after receiving significant damage from the Coast Guard Cutter Anancapa crew firing explosive ammunition into it 180 miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast April 5, 2012. The crew was successful and sank the vessel at 6:15 p.m. in 6,000 feet of water by using explosive ammunition and filling it with water. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon Thomas.

The rusted bottom of the Japanese fishing vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, is exposed as the vessel sinks in the Gulf of Alaska more than 180 miles southwest of Sitka, Alaska, April 5, 2012. The Coast Guard worked closely with federal, state and local agencies to assess the immediate dangers the vessel presented and determined that sinking the vessel at sea would be the best course of action to help minimize any navigation and environmental threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon Thomas.

The Japanese fishing vessel, Ryou-Un Maru, disappears beneath the Gulf of Alaska more than 180 miles southwest of Sitka, Alaska, April 5, 2012. The Coast Guard Cutter Anacapa crew successfully sank the vessel at 6:15 p.m., in 6,000 feet of water, after shooting it multiple rounds of explosive ammunition. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon Thomas

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