Alaska Cultural Connections: Historical Trauma

Many rural Alaskan communities are trying to revive their cultures and languages. But some mental health experts say that in order to revitalize their communities and their families, they first have to acknowledge and heal from the pains of the past. APRN’s Anne Hillman learned about historical trauma as part of an on-going series looking at Culture in Alaska.

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After being told innumerable times that maybe she asked too many questions, Anne Hillman decided to pursue a career in journalism. Her first radio job was at KDLG in Dillingham in 2007, and then she moved to KUCB in Unalaska where she worked for three years in both news and programming. For two years, until May 2014, she alternated between freelancing with APRN and other Alaskan media and working as a community radio journalism trainer in rural South Sudan. Her current position at Alaska Public Media is as the organization’s urban affairs reporter as part of the community affairs desk.

ahillman (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8447  |  About Anne