Anchorage Assembly: Indoor Tennis Courts On Hold, Labor Law Hearing Wednesday

Supporters of building the Northern Lights Recreation Center which would house six indoor tennis courts wore stickers with the words 'Yes on Tennis' scrawled across a green tennis ball at the regular meeting of the Anchorage Assembly Tuesday night.
Supporters of building the Northern Lights Recreation Center, which would house six indoor tennis courts, wore stickers with the words ‘Yes on Tennis’ scrawled across a green tennis ball. Nearly 50 people testified on the issue at the regular meeting of the Anchorage Assembly Tuesday night.

A plan to build indoor tennis courts was put on hold at the regular Anchorage Assembly meeting Tuesday night. The body voted unanimously to accept a 26.5 million dollar bundle of legislative funding for improvements to several city-run buildings, but postponed their vote on whether to accept 10.5 million dollars for the construction of a new city-run Recreation Center. The center would hold six tennis courts and two half-basketball courts. Tennis organizations and Mayor Dan Sullivan support the plan. But some Assembly members are critical of accepting the money because they did not request it. Assembly members said they wanted more time to gather information. Around 50 people testified on the issue. The majority supported building the courts. The issue will be before the Assembly again on October 22nd. Dozens of people who showed up to testify on measures related to a controversial labor law passed last Spring ran out of time to testify at 11pm and the meeting will be continued Wednesday at 6pm.

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Daysha Eaton is the News Director at KBBI in Homer. Daysha Eaton holds a B.A. from Evergreen State College, and a M.A. from the University of Southern California. Daysha got her start in radio at Seattle public radio stations, KPLU and KUOW. Before coming to KBBI, she was the News Director at KYUK in Bethel. She has also worked as the Southcentral Reporter for KSKA in Anchorage. Daysha's work has appeared on NPR's "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered", PRI's "The World" and "National Native News". She's happy to take assignments, and to get news tips, which are best sent via email. Daysha became a journalist because she believes in the power of storytelling. Stories connect us and they help us make sense of our world. They shed light on injustice and they comfort us in troubled times. She got into public broadcasting because it seems to fulfill the intention of the 4th Estate and to most effectively apply the freedom of the press granted to us through the Constitution. She feels that public radio has a special way of moving people emotionally through sound, taking them to remote places, introducing them to people they would not otherwise meet and compelling them to think about issues they might ordinarily overlook.