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Point Hope, Alaska School Holiday Program

By | December 18, 2013

The dancers in this short video are 6th grade students at Tikigaq School in Point Hope, Alaska, an Inupiat village 200 miles above the Arctic Circle. They are performing traditional songs and dances, passed down through the generations, sung in their native language.

The annual school Christmas program in Point Hope is a little different than in most communities. Yes, there are seasonally popular songs and carols, but many of them are sung in Inupiaq, the language of the Tikigaqmuit, the Inupiat Eskimo people of this small whaling community on the edge of the Chukchi Sea.

There is also lots of drumming, singing and dancing performed according to traditions that extend back in time beyond memory. The drums – which resonate much more loudly than one might suspect them capable of at first glance – are made from material such as the membrane of sea mammal organs stretched over wooden frames. The beautiful mukluks (boots) many of the participants wear are hand sewn from seal, caribou, beaver and other natural materials.

The dances celebrate the past and the present. Aaka Irma (Irma Hunnicutt), who volunteered her time to come to our school and teach the students these dances, has an honored place as an elder in this village. Although the students speak mainly English in their day-to-day lives, these celebrations give them the opportunity to honor their language and heritage. This is a place where traditions are still passed down generation to generation; where some of the clothing and much of the food is still provided by the surrounding land and sea; where traditions are alive and vibrant and honored.

On this occasion, the students and Aaka Irma invited their classroom teacher to dance with them.

About Barbra and Jack Donachy

About Barbra:

I’ve always wanted to be a photographer and a traveler. I have arrived. I get to be outside in one of the most beautiful places in the world… Alaska! In this amazing state, the word “awesome” exists in its intended form. As I travel around Alaska, I am constantly awe-struck.

About Jack:

When I was in third grade, I read Call of the Wild thirteen consecutive times. Not the real version. The version I had was in a volume titled Reader’s Digest Best Loved Books for Young Readers. No matter. For half a year of my life, I was Buck. So began a love affair with a place I’d never seen – Alaska.

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