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1410_World-Cafe

Mat Su Borough Looks Ahead to 2015 Legislature

By | August 6, 2014

The Mat Su Borough Assembly met, not to take action on the list, but to discuss the priorities printed out in the form of a resolution. Borough manager John Moosey told the panel that the list held nothing new.. most of the projects on it had been on the table for some time, many of them are partially complete, or near completion

“By establishing our legislative priorities for 2015, it allows staff to get everything together, because we are trying to be more professional more concise on a request, because I feel that is what is demanded, but also, too, because I think that is what leads to success in getting needed funds back from the state. “

 The Port MacKenzie rail extension project, now underway, will take another 116 million dollars before it is finished. Moosey told the body that the project is behind schedule and over budget, mainly because of delays due to lawsuits lobbed against it by certain environmental organizations. Three of the six segments are under construction, but not for the original price of 272 million dollars. Moosey said the project is now 25 million dollars over budget and about two years behind. Moosey says the railroad spur could be done by 2016, if the state funding request is successful.

 Assemblyman Jim Sykes, with his eye toward the Borough budget, asked if the Borough would have to contribute a matching amount to any of the requests on list.

 ”The agenda item didn’t restrict the discussion to legislative priorities, and I think that it would also be useful to consider some of the priorities, like, if we are missing tax revenues by a proposal that comes forward, where are we going to get the money to pay for them. And, how is it that we are going to better forecast our revenues so that we don’t get in a jam in case the federal and state government don’t contribute to us. “

 

Moosey replied that for the most part, the projects rely on state funding, with the exception of a school access project which would be a fifty – fifty split with the state. He told the body that completion of a Seward Meridian Parkway extension would best be paid for with 30 million dollars of Borough funds, to expedite it’s completion.

Another project,  a 13 million dollar interchange between the Borough side access road to the Knik Arm Bridge and a road to Port MacKenzie,  would come from state funds. Sykes asked why an interchange is considered before a bridge is even built. Moosey replied that Borough officials are confident that federal loans to build the bridge are to be secured.

Other Borough projects that may make the final five are 2 point 2 million dollars for land acquisition and design of a leachate treatment facility in the Borough. Moosey said that the city of Anchorage may stop accepting septage and leachate from the Borough before treatment and discharge into Cook Inlet.

The Borough Assembly will make its final decision on the top five projects in meetings to come.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mat Su Borough Assembly met, not to take action on the list, but to discuss the priorities printed out in the form of a resolution. Borough manager John Moosey told the panel that the list held nothing new.. most of the projects on it had been on the table for some time, many of them are partially complete, or near completion

 

 

[CutID: <Worktapes> 05priority moosey 1.wav

Time: 17s

Title: 05priority moosey 1

Description: 05priority moosey 1

In-cue: by establishing

Out-cue: the state]

 

["By establishing our legislative priorities for 2015, it allows staff to get everything together, because we are trying to be more professional more concise on a request, because I feel that is what is demanded, but also, too, because I think that is what leads to success in getting needed funds back from the

state. "]

 

 

The Port MacKenzie rail extension project, now underway, will take another 116 million dollars before it is finished. Moosey told the body that the project is behind schedule and over budget, mainly because of delays due to lawsuits lobbed against it by certain environmental organizations. Three of the six segments are under construction, but not for the original price of 272 million dollars. Moosey said the project is now 25 million dollars over budget and about two years behind. Moosey says the railroad spur could be done by 2016, if the state funding request is successful.

 

Assemblyman Jim Sykes, with his eye toward the Borough budget, asked if the Borough would have to contribute a matching amount to any of the requests on list.

 

 

[CutID: <Worktapes> 05priority sykes 1.wav

Time: 34s

Title: 05priority sykes 1

Description: 05priority sykes 1

In-cue: the agenda item

Out-cue: to us]

 

["The agenda item didn't restrict the discussion to legislative priorities, and I think that it would also be useful to consider some of the priorities, like, if we are missing tax revenues by a proposal that comes forward, where are we going to get the money to pay for them. And, how is it that we are going to better forecast our revenues so that we don't get in a jam in case the federal and state government don't contribute to us. "]

 

Moosey replied that for the most part, the projects rely on state funding, with the exception of a school access project which would be a fifty – fifty split with the state. He told the body that completion of a Seward Meridian Parkway extension would best be paid for with 30 million dollars of Borough funds, to expedite it’s completion.

 

Another project .. a 13 million dollar interchange between the Borough side access road to the Knik Arm Bridge and a road to Port MacKenzie would come from state funds. Sykes asked why an interchange is considered before a bridge is even built. Moosey replied that Borough officials are confident that federal loans to build the bridge are to be secured.

 

Other Borough projects that may make the final five are 2 point 2 million dollars for land acquisition and design of a leachate treatment facility in the Borough. Moosey said that the city of Anchorage may stop accepting septage and leachate from the Borough before treatment and discharge into Cook Inlet.

 

The Borough Assembly will make its final decision on the top five projects in meetings to come. I’m EL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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