Sec. Moniz: We Won’t Be Obstacle to Alaska Gas Exports

Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz is in Alaska this week. He says the Obama Administration wants to spur a project to export North Slope natural gas, and he says the No. 1 way his department can help is by staying out of the way.

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Understanding that ultimately these are going to be some major private sector economic decision to be made, but we are determined not to be an obstacle in any way in that pathway. Getting Alaskan gas monetized is good for the Alaska (economy), good for the country and good for our international security obligations.

Alaska’s oil producers applied to the Department of Energy last month for permits to export liquefied natural gas. The project will require an 800-mile pipeline, a liquefaction plant at Nikiski and other infrastructure. The companies haven’t committed to building the $50 billion system.

Proposals to export gas from the Lower 48 are controversial because of concern they will boost the domestic price of fuel. Moniz says the Administration has already decided the Alaska project will be exempt from requirements to show the price impact on domestic markets.

Moniz is one of four Obama Cabinet members visiting Alaska this summer.  The secretaries of Labor, Transportation and Commerce attended campaign fundraisers for Sen. Mark Begich. Moniz says he isn’t attending any fund-raising events on this trip.

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Liz Ruskin covers Alaska’s congressional delegation, federal agency decisions that shape life in the 49th state, money in politics and elections. She has deep roots in Alaska and this is her third stint in Washington, a city she has grown to love.

She was born in Anchorage and is a West High graduate. She studied political science at the University of Washington and has an M.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri in Columbia. During graduate school, she moved to Washington to intern as a D.C. correspondent. But for her first real journalism job, she moved back to Alaska to work at the Homer News. She was there for three years before taking a job at the Anchorage Daily News. Over the course of nine years in Anchorage, she covered City Hall, courts, state politics, and Native and rural affairs.

Then, in April 2001, she moved back to Washington to work in McClatchy Newspaper’s D.C. bureau as a correspondent for the Anchorage paper. She stayed in the position for five years.

She took a year off for a journalism fellowship at the University of Colorado in Boulder, then freelanced for several years from the U.K. and Japan, in print and radio.

When a vacancy occurred in APRN’s one-person Washington bureau, she jumped at the opportunity. Liz has been APRN’s Washington, D.C. correspondent since October 2013.

lruskin (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  | About Liz