Body of Second Missing Kuskokwim Traveler Recovered

Bethel Search and Rescue reports they’ve found a body of a man that went missing in December near Kwethluk. The body is believed to be that of 26-year-old George Evan of Akiak. Evan was one of three people that went missing while traveling on a four-wheeler during a storm on December 12th.

Search and rescue crews used chainsaws to cut the ice open during their search. (Photo courtesy of BSAR)
Search and rescue crews used chainsaws to cut the ice open during their search. (Photo courtesy of BSAR)

Searchers say they found Evan’s remains Wednesday afternoon. They say his body was found about 46-feet underwater on the riverbed and under the ice about a quarter mile down Kuskokwak Slough from where another body was recovered last month.

The body of 51-year-old Ralph ‘Jimmy’ Demantle was found on December 15thnear an open hole where the 4-wheeler was recovered just after the group went missing. The third traveler, 27-year-old Sally Stone is still missing.

Evan’s remains were located by using a remote operated vehicle owned and operated by Tom Crossmon of Deluth, Missouri who volunteered for the recovery.

Charles Enoch contributed to this story.

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Daysha Eaton is the News Director at KBBI in Homer. Daysha Eaton holds a B.A. from Evergreen State College, and a M.A. from the University of Southern California. Daysha got her start in radio at Seattle public radio stations, KPLU and KUOW. Before coming to KBBI, she was the News Director at KYUK in Bethel. She has also worked as the Southcentral Reporter for KSKA in Anchorage. Daysha's work has appeared on NPR's "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered", PRI's "The World" and "National Native News". She's happy to take assignments, and to get news tips, which are best sent via email. Daysha became a journalist because she believes in the power of storytelling. Stories connect us and they help us make sense of our world. They shed light on injustice and they comfort us in troubled times. She got into public broadcasting because it seems to fulfill the intention of the 4th Estate and to most effectively apply the freedom of the press granted to us through the Constitution. She feels that public radio has a special way of moving people emotionally through sound, taking them to remote places, introducing them to people they would not otherwise meet and compelling them to think about issues they might ordinarily overlook.