Governor signs SLAM bill for Kashevaroff, Foster

Gov. Bill Walker signs the bill Tuesday morning as Juneau Mayor Merrill Sanford, Rep. Sam Kito III and Sen. Dennis Egan look on. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)
Gov. Bill Walker signs the bill Tuesday morning as Juneau Mayor Merrill Sanford, Rep. Sam Kito III and Sen. Dennis Egan look on. (Photo by Lisa Phu/KTOO)

Gov. Bill Walker signed a bill this morning officially naming the new State Libraries, Archives and Museum Building after Father Andrew P. Kashevaroff. The signing took place in the historical library in Juneau’s State Office Building.

Of Russian and Native heritage, Father Kashevaroff was the first librarian and curator of the Alaska Historical Museum and Library when it relocated to Juneau in 1919.

Bob Banghart is deputy director of the Division of Libraries, Archives and Museums.

“He was charged with the task of getting it on its feet and going forward with it, and if you look at the diagrams of the old facility, it would almost appear to be a cabin of curiosities. He was pulling in material from all over,” Banghart says. “But you read his writings and he was deeply engaged in social issue, the studying of cultures.”

Kashevaroff acquired thousands of objects for the museum. He held the position for 20 years until his death in 1940. Kashevaroff was also the Russian Orthodox priest of Juneau’s St. Nicholas Church.

Juneau Sen. Dennis Egan’s bill naming the SLAM building also honors former Rep. Richard Foster from Nome. A reading room upstairs in the facility will be named after him.

“Richard was in the archives all the time. If he was missing on the House floor, they’d have a page go down to archives and there would be Richard,” Egan says.

The Father Andrew P. Kashevaroff State Library, Archives, and Museum Building is being built in downtown Juneau. It’s scheduled to open to the public next May. Kashevaroff’s portrait will be on the Founders Wall located off to the right as you enter the facility.