Andrew Kitchenman, APRN & KTOO - Juneau

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The Legislature has gone past the deadline set under state law to finish the annual session – and there are few signs that they’ll be finishing their work soon. Instead of making announcements on major bills, the two chambers passed smaller legislation. Listen now

The House passed a bill Saturday that would bring a state income tax to Alaska for the first time in 37 years. The vote sends it to the Senate, where leaders oppose the tax. Listen now

Vice President Mike Pence stopped in Anchorage on Saturday and met with Governor Bill Walker. Listen now

The news about oil revenue comes out two days before the Legislature was scheduled to end its session. But with much work left to do, lawmakers will continue to work in Juneau next week. To talk about this, Alaska Public Media's Lori Townsend spoke with Alaska Public Media and KTOO’s Andrew Kitchenman. Listen now

Alaska’s Legislature is on pace to pass fewer bills than in any other session in the state’s history. And it’s not clear whether lawmakers will be able to agree on a plan to fix the state’s budget for the future. Listen now

The Senate voted Wednesday to delay a joint session on whether to confirm Gov. Bill Walker’s appointments. When the hearing does happen, one of Walker’s appointments to the Alaska State Commission for Human Rights potentially faces a close vote. Listen now

When Senator Mike Dunleavy left the Senate majority last week, he knew it meant he would lose some of his official positions of power. Listen now

The House Finance Committee is taking a new approach and will combine its proposals to institute an income tax and raise oil and gas taxes with a proposal to draw money from Permanent Fund earnings to pay for the state government. Listen now

Wasilla Republican Sen. Mike Dunleavy announced he’s leaving the Senate majority, before the Senate passed its budget on Thursday. Listen now

Yesterday new legislation was passed that named Oct 25th as African American Soldiers’ Contribution to Building the Alaska Highway Day. All 19 senators who were present and 39 of the 40 House members voted for the bill. Listen now

To some House members, reintroducing an income tax in Alaska is the best way to close a long-term gap between how much the state government spends and what it raises in revenue. Listen now

The Senate will debate a state government budget for the coming year that is $262 million less than the current budget. Listen now

Alaska schools would see a $69 million cut in the amount of money the state provides based on the number of students each school district serves, called the base student allocation, under the budget proposed by the Senate Finance Committee on Monday. Listen now

Alaska is projected to owe public workers more than $6 billion more in pensions than it has in assets. So state officials are looking for ways to save money. Listen now

The total costs from alcohol and drug abuse and dependence in Alaska are more than $3 billion per year, according to a new Alaska Mental Health Trust report completed by the McDowell Group. Listen now

The amount Alaska’s state government spends on health care is one of the biggest drivers of state spending. That’s why the legislature is looking at ways to reduce health care costs. Listen now

UPS and Delta Air Lines oppose a proposal to triple the state’s jet fuel tax. But the Alaska Trucking Association supports a similar increase on fuel for cars and trucks. Listen now

House members from both sides of the aisle have put forward new ideas to balance the state government budget into the future. Listen now

Time is running out for Alaskans who work on military bases to get IDs like passports that comply with federal law ahead of an early June deadline. Alaska National Guard leader Major Gen. Laurie Hummel spoke about the effect of federal REAL ID Act requirements during the state’s military leaders’ annual visit to the Legislature Thursday (March 23). Listen now

Philosophical differences between members of the House and Senate are raising the risk that the Legislature ends the session without resolving the state’s ongoing budget crisis. Listen now