Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media

Anne Hillman, Alaska Public Media
550 POSTS 0 COMMENTS
After being told innumerable times that maybe she asked too many questions, Anne Hillman decided to pursue a career in journalism. She's reported from around Alaska since 2007 and briefly worked as a community radio journalism trainer in rural South Sudan. ahillman (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8447  |  About Anne

About 2,000 people participated in the March for Science in Anchorage on Saturday. Participants carried signs talking about scientific contributions to medicine, such as “Got the Plague?! Ya, me neither! Thank a scientist!” Other signs addressed the impacts of climate change saying “There is no Planet B” and “The oceans are rising and so are we.”

The Statewide Trails Conference opens Thursday in Anchorage and will focus on issues such as making trails sustainable and active transportation. It brings together land managers, trail users, and trail builders for a three-day event.

The state's Department of Corrections is trying a new tactic to stop the opioid epidemic: offering Vivitrol shots. It’s a monthly injection that curbs cravings for heroin and other drugs and stops people from getting high. Inmates receive their first shots right before re-entering the community.

From lost jobs to family emergencies to mental health conditions, everyone who has experienced homelessness has a different story. Many people are just one paycheck away. Join us for an open conversation on Tuesday, April 25 at 6 pm about the pathways into homelessness and the strategies different community members and organizations are using to try to solve the problem.

The state’s Department of Health and Social Services is starting to distribute Narcan kits around Alaska. The nasal spray stops opioid overdoses. For one woman at the Covenant House, helping build the kits is personal. The drug has saved her life. Listen now

For the past 50 years, Alaska Legal Services Corporation has offered free legal help to low-income Alaskans. Cases have ranged from private matters, like guardianship designations and protective orders, to statewide issues such as building high schools in rural Alaska. President Donald Trump’s budget blueprint eliminates federal funding for legal services programs nationwide, which would have a direct impact on Alaskans. Listen now

A new culinary school that teaches more than the difference between saute and simmer opened in Anchorage last fall to provide classes for people who are homeless or are leaving prison. Instructors at Feed Me Hope go beyond teaching cooking skills to teach life skills. Listen now

This week we're hearing from Tsolmon Damba in Anchorage. Demba is a nursing student from Mongolia who arrived in Alaska nearly seven years ago to attend UAA. She says the city is not what she expected. Listen now

What's it like to live with a mental illness and to go through recovery? How do people react to you? What assumptions do they make? Learn more about mental health and how it shapes our communities during the next Community in Unity.

An Alaska family struggles with the new interpretations of federal immigration laws and what it means for their future. Listen now

The Anchorage Police Department announced its new targeted crime plan Thursday. It focuses on getting into the community and developing relationships. APD will expand its foot patrols beyond downtown and into Mountain View, Fairview, and Spenard.

The Portland Cello Project, a multi-genre cello ensemble, recently visited the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center, a women's prison located in Eagle River, to work with Hiland's orchestra. Listen now
The Alaska State Legislature sign at the Legislative Information Office in Downtown Anchorage.

Law enforcement officers in Alaska can legally have sexual contact with people they are investigating for crimes. Proposed legislation seeks to change that. A new survey shows that most Alaskans didn't know the practice was legal and do not support it. Listen now

Some foster kids are eligible to receive Social Security benefits, but the kids and their families don’t always know the money is available. Instead, the state applies for the benefits and puts the funds toward paying for foster care services. Now a lawsuit is asking if the state needs to notify families and guardians before it starts taking the money. A judge heard oral arguments last month. Listen now

The Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority is trying to change the laws that govern how it uses its principal funds. Some board members hope the legislation will pass soon enough that the organization does not have to undergo a special legislative audit. Listen now

The Office of Children’s Services isn’t alone in taking responsibility for child welfare. Volunteers also step up to oversee the foster care system, suggest policy changes, and advocate on behalf of individual kids. Join us on the next Talk of Alaska as we discuss community oversight of the child welfare system and ways you can be part of the solution. Listen Now

A new study from a state epidemiologist looks at infants who were exposed to opiates before birth. Unlike previous studies, it goes beyond the sharp rise in cases for a portion of the population to explore what happens next. The data cannot be generalized to the whole state. Listen now
Alaska News Nightly by Alaska Public Media

After an expedited review, a referendum on Anchorage's new taxi cab regulation will be on the April ballot. The ballot question asks voters if they want to repeal an ordinance that passed last December, creating more than 100 additional taxi permits in the municipality over the next five years. Listen now

The program will focus on how we create understanding and have conversations about faith with people who are different from us. We’ll talk about common misconceptions about the three major Western/Abrahamic religions and how they overlap. Listen Now

After three years of waiting for special immigrant visas, a family from Iraq finally arrived in Anchorage last fall. They were seeking safety. Then, on January 27, President Trump signed an executive order, and everything seemed to change. Listen now