Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska - Juneau

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Ed Schoenfeld is at CoastAlaska in Juneau
The ferry Taku sails into the Wrangell Narrows on its way south in 2013. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)

Next winter’s ferry schedule will be leaner than this year’s, and that was pretty lean. It’s the result of budget cuts, which could lead to the sale of the ferry Taku. Download Audio

The state and a regional development group are combining forces to come up with a new business and management plan for the Alaska Marine Highway System. Download Audio

The winners of Alaska’s "Name The New Ferry" contest didn’t know about it until they got a call from Gov. Bill Walker and Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott. Tuesday’s announcement revealed that one would be the Tazlina and the other the Hubbard. Download Audio

Tlingit leader John Borbridge Jr. died Tuesday. He was a significant player in the campaign for Alaska Native land rights. Download Audio
Alaska News Nightly by Alaska Public Media

Southeast Alaska’s regional Native corporation is back in the seafood business. Juneau-based Sealaska on Monday announced the purchase of a minority share of a Seattle processing plant. Download Audio
Passengers disembark the ferry Malaspina in Skagway during its 50th anniversary sailing. Most ferry fares went up Jan. 1. (Photo by Mikko Wilson/360 North)

Should the Alaska Marine Highway System be managed differently? That’s a question being asked by ferry advocates as they cope with smaller budgets and reduced schedules.

Sealaska, Southeast’s regional Native corporation, continues its financial recovery. But its operational side is still losing money and even its investments are in the red. Sealaska just released its 2015 annual report, which illustrates its financial ups and downs.

Southeast Alaska's largest tribal organization wants to expand its service programs. Part of the effort could be funded by profits from a business it's about to purchase.

Beginning in May, it will cost 14 percent more to take the ferry to and from the Lower 48. The fare boost is part of another round of Alaska Marine Highway System tariff increases. Officials said they’ll increase income and help equalize rates across all routes.
Alaska News Nightly by Alaska Public Media

As lawmakers finish off their spending plan for state operations, a wide variety of programs are considering the impacts of budget cuts. One is the state public health center system, where reductions could leave communities without some types of care. Download Audio

Weather may have been a factor in April 8th's plane crash on Admiralty Island. The crash killed the pilot and two passengers and badly injured another person on board. Download Audio

Wrangell residents are mourning the loss of three members of their community in Friday’s plane crash on Admiralty Island. Download Audio
A passenger on the deck of an Alaska Marine Highway ferry. (Flickr Creative Commons – supafly)

A Southeast lawmaker wants communities to be able to contribute directly to the Alaska Marine Highway System. Download Audio

The U.S. Supreme Court will not take up a case that could have expanded logging in Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. It’s the final step in a legal battle against what’s called the Roadless Rule, which bans logging and road-building in most undeveloped national forest areas. Download Audio

The Alaska Folk Festival runs April 4th through 10th in Juneau. It’s a sure sign of spring for the hundreds of musicians from all over the state who come to play, jam and listen. CoastAlaska’s Ed Schoenfeld caught up with a Juneau singer-songwriter. He’s one of many performers who are serious about their music, but don’t leave their day jobs. Download Audio

Alaska shellfish farmers hope a new state mariculture initiative will help boost their businesses. But they warn it’s not an easy industry to expand. Download Audio

Southeast Alaska’s largest tribal government is pressing for an intensive environmental analysis of the region’s health. It’s part of a larger push for protection of transboundary rivers, which flow from British Columbia into the region. Download Audio

Southeast Alaska’s largest tribal government is pressing for an intensive environmental analysis of the region’s health. It’s part of a larger push for protection of transboundary rivers, which flow from British Columbia into the region.

Southeast Alaska is growing older faster than any other region in the state. This so-called “Silver Tsunami” is expanding the need for housing, transportation, healthcare and social services. CoastAlaska public radio stations are presenting a series of reports talking to our older community members – and those they work with – about many of the issues they face.

The largest tribal government in Southeast Alaska now has authority over foster care and other services for Native children facing abuse or neglect. An agreement signed Wednesday this week transfers state management, as well as funding, to the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. Download Audio