Katarina Sostaric, KSTK - Wrangell

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A plane crashed on Admiralty Island Friday morning southeast of Angoon after departing from Wrangell. Download Audio

British Columbia officials introduced law changes last week that would strengthen their ability to enforce mining laws in response to the Mount Polley tailings dam disaster of 2014. But critics in Alaska are not convinced the B.C. government would use those penalties to protect watersheds in Southeast. Under the new laws, British Columbia’s Ministry of Energy and Mines would be able to fine mining companies for safety violations without taking them to court.

Former Wrangell doctor Greg Salard will spend the next 20 years in prison for receiving and distributing child pornography. Salard was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Juneau on Tuesday after his conviction during a jury trial in Juneau last July. Salard appeared in court slightly thinner and without his horseshoe moustache. He smiled at his wife and a family friend in the gallery after he took his seat at the defense table.

Former Wrangell doctor Greg Salard was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison for receipt and distribution of child pornography. Salard, 54, will also have a lifetime of supervised release after prison and a $25,000 fine. He was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Juneau. Download Audio

Federal prosecutors are recommending a 20-year prison term followed by a lifetime of supervised release for former Wrangell doctor Greg Salard ahead of his sentencing hearing next week.

Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott sent the second draft of a Statement of Cooperation to British Columbia officials last week as part of an ongoing effort to preserve water quality and fisheries of the Stikine, Taku, Unuk and Alsek rivers.

A Wrangell father and son were sentenced Monday in U.S. District Court after pleading guilty to Lacey Act violations while commercial halibut fishing in Alaska waters.

The former Wrangell doctor convicted on child pornography charges had his request for a new trial denied and will be sentenced next month.

A Wrangell artist who creates fused glass artwork and jewelry has been a fixture at community markets and bazaars in town. But this December, Magpie and Squid owner Kris Reed decided to open a store for just one month to sell her artwork and teach art classes.

The Tongass Advisory Committee ended a 16-month series of meetings Thursday, formally completing its effort to advise the Tongass National Forest in a transition from old to young growth logging.

A Catholic priest who served parishes in Wrangell and Petersburg died Sunday night, 10 days after suffering a heart attack.

A missing Wrangell boater was found dead Wednesday afternoon, according to a dispatch from the Alaska State Troopers.

Alaska State Troopers, the U.S. Coast Guard and Wrangell Search and Rescue are searching for an overdue boater in the Wrangell area.

Alaska State Troopers, the U.S. Coast Guard and Wrangell Search and Rescue are searching for an overdue boater in the Wrangell area.

The U.S. Forest Service is proposing increases to cabin rental fees on Alaska’s national forests. Cabin prices have been the same since the 1990s, and now some fees could more than double over the next three years.

A Wrangell father and son have pleaded guilty to federal charges related to Lacey Act violations while commercial halibut fishing in Alaska waters. Federal prosecutors announced the plea Tuesday.

The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation announced on Sept. 21 that it will spend about $4 million to clean up a former Wrangell junkyard site with high levels of lead contamination. Download Audio

Lester Daniels Ortua, a 34-year-old deckhand on the Pacifica, likely died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

A protest in Wrangell on Sunday marked the one-year anniversary of a mining disaster in Canada and sought to bring attention to mines being developed across the border from Southeast Alaska. About 100 people marched through Wrangell behind a banner that read “Keep the Stikine Clean.” Download Audio

The Wrangell Cooperative Association cut the ribbon on its cultural center and carving shed Saturday, completing the second phase of the tribe’s three-part Native cultural revival plan. The center will serve as a place for recreating eight sacred totem poles and for teaching Native arts. Download Audio