Lori Townsend, Alaska Public Media

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Lori Townsend is the News Director for the Alaska Public Radio Network. She got her start in broadcasting at the age of 11 as the park announcer of the fast pitch baseball games in Deer Park, Wisconsin. She has worked in print and broadcast journalism for more than 18 years. She was the co-founder and former Editor of Northern Aspects, a magazine featuring northern Wisconsin writers and artists. She worked for 7 years at tribal station WOJB on the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibway Reservation in Wisconsin, first as an on-air programmer and special projects producer and eventually News Director. In 1997 she co-hosted a continuing Saturday afternoon public affairs talk program on station KSTP in St. Paul, Minnesota. Radio brought her to Alaska where she worked as a broadcast trainer for Native fellowship students at Koahnic Broadcasting. Following her work there, she helped co-found the non-profit broadcast company Native Voice Communications with veteran Alaskan broadcasters Nellie Moore, D’Anne Hamilton, Len Anderson, Sharon McConnell and Veronica Iya. NVC created the award-winning Independent Native News as well as producing many other documentaries and productions. Townsend was NVC’s technical trainer and assistant producer of INN. Through her freelance work, she has produced news and feature stories nationally and internationally for Independent Native News, National Native News, NPR , Pacifica, Monitor Radio, Radio Netherlands and AIROS. Her print work and interviews have been published in News from Indian Country, Yakama Nation Review and other publications. Ms. Townsend has also worked as a broadcast trainer for the Native American Journalist’s Association and with NPR’s Doug Mitchell and as a freelance editor. Townsend is the recipient of numerous awards for her work from the Alaska Press Club, the Native American Journalists Association and a gold and a silver reel award from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. Townsend was the recipient of a Fellowship at the Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting in Rhode Island as well as a fellowship at the Knight Digital Media Center in Berkeley. She is an avid reader, a rabid gardener and counts water skiing, training horses, diving and a welding certification among her past and current interests. ltownsend (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  |  907.550.8452 | About Lori

Alaska lawmakers avoided a state government shut down by passing an operating budget, but the deal doesn't address long term stability and both Republicans and Democrats expressed disappointment over things they had to give up. The political divisions remain.

40 years ago, the first barrel of oil started flowing down the trans-Alaska pipeline. Completing the pipeline was an epic, three-year saga that required tens of thousands of workers, great feats of engineering and perilous work on mountain passes. On the next Talk of Alaska, we'll explore that pipeline history as part of the series Midnight Oil, from Alaska's Energy Desk. Listen Here

The study by U.S. Geological Survey researchers and others said the already at-risk bears have to burn more calories to stay within their preferred habitat as sea ice drifts. Researchers have documented declining body condition, reproduction and survival among polar bears as diminished sea ice gives them fewer opportunities to hunt for seals.

Polar bears need sea ice to survive. Scientist Steven Amstrup has devoted his career to polar bear research and is definitive in calling for global action in reducing greenhouse gas emissions such as those outlined in the Paris climate accord. The U.S. is no longer party to the agreement. So now what? LISTEN HERE

Over the last few decades, the role of women in media and newsrooms has dramatically changed. From being confined to writing mostly about humor or household tips, now, women commentators and columnists write about politics, sports, the economy and yes, family life, too. From Erma Bombeck to Molly Ivins, the role for women in society's dialogue has matured. Three of the state's columnists join us on the next Talk of Alaska. Listen Now

Russian fighters have flown near Alaska's coast 5 times in recent weeks. U.S. military officials stress the flights and intercepts are within the realm of normal, a Russia expert says it's a test of American readiness. Where do these incidents fit within the current and future role of security in the region? Senator Dan Sullivan will discuss it on the next Talk of Alaska. Listen Now

Alaska is in a recession...again. There's a lot of hand wringing about the state's fiscal future but beyond simply bridging the current funding gap, what can and should a diversified economy look like? A new 5-year economic strategy developed with state and private sector business leaders focuses on addressing Alaska economic future. Listen Now

For a teacher who loves nurturing confidence in students as much as he loves mathematics, being the first Alaskan to be inducted into the National Teacher's Hall of Fame was the fitting cap on nearly 30 years of inspiring young people in Alaska and other parts of the world. Listen now

Allergy and asthma sufferers beware, the pollen and mold season is upon us. There are only two spore collection sites in the state, Fairbanks and Anchorage, and the instruments were activated this week. The University of Alaska and the Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Center run the monitoring program. Listen now

Last week, Russian military planes flew near Alaska's coast on four separate occasions. American military intercepted two of the flights and Canadian fighters joined their U.S. counterparts during the fourth intercept. All were legal, in international airspace and American military leaders have downplayed concern. Listen now

What does it take to be a sustainable fishery? One that provide healthy food and healthy oceans? A new Frontline Documentary entitled the Fish on my Plate by bestselling author Paul Greenberg tackles that question. Greenberg visited Alaska and traveled the world's oceans and fish farms to find out, eating only seafood for a full year. Listen Now

In a new memoir, Alaskan author Kate Troll tackles the issue of conservation and climate change. The book is called The Great Unconformity: Reflections on Hope in an Imperiled World. Listen now

The legislature has gone past the 90-day mark as they try to find a solution to the state's fiscal crisis. Lawmakers from both chambers seem to agree on using permanent fund earnings but they're having a harder time finding common ground on budget cuts and new taxes. Listen Now

$3 billion. That's the annual expense associated with alcohol and drug abuse in Alaska. The numbers were compiled in a new report for the Alaska Mental Health Trust. Organizations across the state are trying to mitigate that impact through a variety of treatment options. What's working? Listen Now

State lawmakers continue to chip away at the budget to stabilize state finances. Millions of dollars have been cut from government spending and some lawmakers want millions more slashed. How is that affecting communities across the state? Listen Now

It's been 150 years since Russia sold Alaska to the United States. Two new books look at the man who sold the land and the man who bought it. There's a lot of history to discover about Tsar Alexander the 2nd of Russia and William H Seward. Listen Now

Jimmy Settle knows what it is to struggle back to health after being shot in the head. Settle and co-author Don Rearden recently released their new book, Never Quit. Listen now

What lies ahead for the Arctic and the people who live there? Researchers will gather in Anchorage, to present studies on changes in arctic plants and animals, food security and how remote population will need to adapt to increasing development, vessel traffic and tourism. Listen Now
Naloxone HCl preparation, pre-filled Luer-Jet package for intravenous administration. (Creative Commons photo by Intropin)

The state senate today (March 16) passed a bill that leaves in place an order to provide Naloxone, an anti-overdose drug to Alaskan organizations and individuals for another four years. Governor Bill Walker had issued a 30 day emergency disaster declaration in February to make Naloxone widely available. Listen now

Wednesday was International Women's Day. Some women in the U.S. stayed home from work to highlight the economic importance of women. Others wore red in a show of solidarity or committed to not shopping for the day or only shopping at women owned businesses. Listen now