Rachel Waldholz, Alaska's Energy Desk - Anchorage

Rachel Waldholz, Alaska's Energy Desk - Anchorage
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Rachel Waldholz covers energy and the environment for Alaska's Energy Desk, a collaboration between Alaska Public Media, KTOO in Juneau and KUCB in Unalaska. Before coming to Anchorage, she spent two years reporting for Raven Radio in Sitka. Rachel studied documentary production at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, and her short film, A Confused War won several awards. Her work has appeared on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Marketplace, among other outlets. rwaldholz (at) alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8432 | About Rachel

Nikoosh Carlo began work this month in a newly created position: senior adviser for climate. Listen now

It's a model with lessons for remote communities from the Arctic to the equator - and for cities on the big grids of the Lower 48, from New York to Houston. Listen now

It's like a dance, or an orchestra: Each piece of the grid watches the rest and responds second by second, millisecond by millisecond. Listen now

Several national labs and universities will partner with the Alaska community of Cordova to field test new technologies on the city’s power grid. Listen now

Most renewable energy projects in rural Alaska have been funded with state and federal grants. But as state money dries up, an Anchorage start-up wants to bring private investors to the table. Listen now

The proposal comes just months after Tillerson visited Alaska and spoke about the importance of the Arctic. Some worry it’s a sign the Trump administration will be less engaged in the region.

Several hundred Pacific walrus are hauled out on a barrier island near the village of Point Lay, on the Chukchi Sea coast. It's the earliest such haul out since the walrus first started showing up in 2007 -- and may be linked to this year's rapidly retreating Arctic sea ice. Listen now

A new government report warns that regions across the U.S. are feeling the effects of rapid climate change, with some of the greatest impacts in Alaska and the Arctic. And it states the evidence that human activity is driving climate change is stronger than ever. Listen now

Abraham Ellis is with the Sandia National Labs in New Mexico. “We are interested in those technologies to figure out ways to improve the energy resilience for cities,” he said. “For defense applications, and things like that, that really need to keep on going with electricity supply, even if the normal grid fails for whatever reason.”

Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski says she finds last week’s testimony from fired FBI Director James Comey “troubling.”

President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord drew muted reactions from Alaska officials on Thursday. Listen now

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson got an earful from governments around the Arctic today — on the topic of climate change. Listen now

As representatives from eight Arctic nations gather in Fairbanks, one issue is looming over the meeting: climate change. Listen now

When the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound in 1989, the immediate effects were pretty obvious. Researchers estimate that hundreds of thousands of sea birds and thousands of sea otters died within months, among other impacts. Listen now

By the end of the century, researchers predict climate change could displace millions of people across the country, as rising sea levels and erosion hit coastal communities. As policymakers start to grapple with that reality, there’s a specific phrase making the rounds: “managed retreat.” In other words, relocating whole neighborhoods or communities and retreating from the coast. Listen now

BP is working to contain an out-of-control production well at the Prudhoe Bay oil field on the North Slope. The well is currently venting natural gas and has released at least some crude oil into the environment. Listen now

A natural gas leak in Cook Inlet has finally been repaired, more than three months after it began. Listen now

Dive teams are finally working to repair Hilcorp’s leaking natural gas pipeline in Cook Inlet. Listen now

For decades, Alaska has struggled to get running water and sewer systems to its rural communities. An estimated 3,000 households — or about 10,000 people — still lack both. Now, that job may be getting harder, as climate change exacerbates old problems and creates new ones. Listen now

On Tuesday (March 28), President Donald Trump signed an executive order aimed at rolling back many of the Obama administration’s efforts to curb climate change. The order comes as surveys show Americans remain divided over global warming’s causes and consequences. Listen now