Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media

Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media
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Zachariah Hughes reports on city & state politics, arts & culture, drugs, and military affairs in Anchorage and South Central Alaska. zhughes [at] alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8424 | @ZachHughesAK About Zachariah

On this week's Alaska Edition, host, Zachariah Hughes sits down with three reporters to talk all about music in Alaska. What's new? What's happening across the state? And what's changing?

In the wake of a controversial sale announcement, 17,000 donors pooled funds to buy KPLU's licence from Pacific Lutheran University. Download Audio

The small craft brewing industry is thriving, but state support for the burgeoning alcohol sector doesn't sit well with everyone. Download Audio

In order to make a downtown Anchorage park safer, officials will destroy a decades-old fountain. It's one of several measures Mayor Ethan Berkowitz introduced during an outdoor press conference in Town Square Park on Wednesday. Download Audio

City officials say the change is necessary to fix a major staffing problem that's grown worse in recent years. Download Audio

Aviators in Southcentral Alaska are being asked to observe a temporary flight restriction Saturday evening during a brief presidential visit. Download Audio

The House Finance committee added an amendment to its capital budget that gives the University of Alaska leftover funds to pursue developing the Elmore Extension into the U-Med district, a move widely opposed by community groups. Download Audio

After diving into the data on crime rates across the Municipality of Anchorage, a middle school class decided police staffing levels are the main problem confronting residents. Download Audio

Alaska Democrats spent the weekend in Anchorage picking delegates for the party’s national convention in Philadelphia this July, and setting priorities for the year ahead. Download Audio

Alaska Democrats are hosting their state convention Friday through Sunday in Anchorage. More than 500 party members from across the state are attending, and the event culminates in the selection of delegates to attend the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia this July. Download Audio

In a Tuesday letter, lawyers for the bank holding debt for renovations threaten to sue the state over breach of contract. Download Audio

The Anchorage Assembly officially waded into the state’s complicate battle over the LIO, asking state lawmakers to respect the city's comprehensive development plan.

Measures for introduction and testimony at body's regular meeting are set to deal with workers compensation claims, pay for police and fire-fighters, and money for the Center for Performing Arts.

When people imagine Alaska's Arctic, the first thing that comes to mind usually isn't experimental art. But a new exhibit at the Anchorage Museum is getting visitors, urbanites, and art-lovers to connect to the Arctic in different ways. The works expand well beyond the gallery walls. Download Audio

The Legislative Council approved spending up to $12.5 million to buy the Walls Fargo Bank building in Anchorage’s Spenard neighborhood on Monday. The building would be used for legislative offices and to provide a venue for public testimony.

A months long search has yielded two candidates with very different experience across Alaska's schools. Download Audio

The total price-tag on Anchorage's 2016 operating budget is about $488 million, up slightly, with uncertainties lingering from extended legislative session.

In a year with a controversial new personal conduct rule, 24-year-old musher with a conviction and open assault charge was allowed to compete.

As aggressive corrosion rapidly degrades the Port of Anchorage, its funding future is in the hands of Juneau lawmakers. Funding for construction and rehabilitation of port infrastructure was the only financial request of the mayor’s administration in Anchorage for this session. But the possibility of action on a major spending project, even one most see as critical and inevitable, is nearly impossible according to lawmakers on both sides.

The Port of Anchorage is literally coming apart, threatening to upend the state's essential supply chain in what officials have called "a slow motion disaster." Every year, millions are spent just combating the rapid corrosion of the Port's basic infrastructure. But without hundreds of millions for major rehabilitation work approved by lawmakers, the nexus point for much of the state's fuel, food, and building supplies is at risk. Alaska Public Media's Zachariah Hughes has part two in our series about the port. Download Audio