Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media

Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media
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Zachariah Hughes reports on city & state politics, arts & culture, drugs, and military affairs in Anchorage and South Central Alaska. zhughes [at] alaskapublic (dot) org | 907.550.8424 | @ZachHughesAK About Zachariah

It's official: The Army has decided to keep the 4-25th brigade combat team intact at Joint Base Elmendof-Richardson in Anchorage. Listen now

The sole highway heading south out of Anchorage was closed because of what police described as a "distraught man." A manhunt is still underway for a suspect who allegedly discharged a weapon multiple times. Hours later, an avalanche knocked out power in the area, as well. Listen now

Progressive candidates and incumbents win, along with former law-maker in Eagle River and an upset in south Anchorage. Taxi proposition and ambulance bond measure fail. Listen now

When Anchorage voters head to the polls for municipal elections on Tuesday, residents in every corner of town will be choosing representatives for the Assembly. More than half of the 11 seats are up for election, which could tip the body's balance of power. There are also two school board races.

The Republic of Turkey is about as far as you can go from Alaska on the other side of the globe. The country of nearly 80 million people straddles the edges of Europe and Asia, with a Mediterranean climate, and a rich history as the seat of both the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires. Again, not a lot of parallels with Alaska. But both places have food and dance at the center of their cultural traditions. Listen now
The Anchorage Assembly chambers at the Z. J. Loussac Public Library in Anchorage.

The Municipality of Anchorage is partnering with a private foundation to fund a new position that'll be in charge of overseeing housing issues. Listen now

For nearly a week, racers continue arriving ahead of the banquet that officially concludes each year's Iditarod. For some, that means days of free time. And plenty of fun, strange events to fill it. Listen now

In this episode, we talk about the 2017 Iditarod, what happens after the mushers reach Nome, and the person behind the @IditaTrump Twitter account.

The Blood Bank of Alaska said it has been cleared of any alleged wrong-doing and financial impropriety by an audit that wrapped up earlier this month. But a critic disputes that conclusion. Listen now

The huskies running today’s Iditarod bear little resemblance to the bulky sled-dogs Alaskans used to rely on year-round. As breeding programs have refined genetic lines to create dogs designed to excel at the thousand-mile winter-time race, the cost of specialization has been a lack of versatility. Listen now

The top ten teams have arrived in Nome, filling out the upper ranks of the 2017 Iditarod Sled Dog Race. Listen now

In Episode 15, we talk about Mitch Seavey's record-breaking run, Aliy Zirkle vying for a top-10 finish, and taking a refreshing sauna in Unalakleet.

Mushers who have been competing in the Iditarod a long time have relationships and traditions they re-visit each time they run the race. And for Martin Buser, when he gets to Unalakleet, that means a bag of muktuk. Listen now

In Episode 14, we talk about Mitch Seavey being the first musher out of White Mountain, we get a lesson in Iditarod tradition and histoy, and discuss mushers' strategies for resting their dogs.

Iditarod mushers face a grueling next few days. Not just those fighting tooth-and-nail at the top of the pack but, also, everyone else with competitive ambitions jockeying for spots in the top 10, 20 and 30.

The Iditarod Trail Committee said it’s changing protocols for how it transports dropped sled dogs after an one died Friday while in the organization’s care. An early necropsy on the dog showed it had overheated, dying of hyperthermia while on board a plane. Listen now

In Episode 13, we talk about Mitch Seavey's rush up the coast, what's going on in the middle of the pack, a musher reflecting on his dog's death, and we address a bunch more listener questions.

In Episode 12, we talk about Mitch Seavey taking the lead, the Iditarod's international contingent, and we hear harrowing Iditasport tales.

In Episode 11, we talk about: How few dogs have been dropped, the rookies are making a run for it,  and Huslia's mushing tradition.

The first three mushers to arrive in Huslia all had 16 dogs on the line—the same number they started the race with nearly 500 miles ago. Up and down the leader-board mushers are arriving with big teams, and dropping far fewer dogs than in recent years. Listen now