The world's best choir is planning a free concert in Anchorage Oct. 4 and 5. The Gracias Choir and Orchestra brings a bit of Christmas flavor to Alaska in October, and the family-friendly show depends on a network of enthusiastic volunteers to make it happen. Listen now
(Photo by Scott Burton/KTOO)

A new plywood cut-out of a person in front of city hall is part of a national effort to bring awareness to homelessness. The social art project began in Charleston, South Carolina where the city collaborated with a design firm to create 430 plywood figures—the estimated number of homeless people in the city at the time. The figures were then placed in park in front of their City Hall. Now, the project has gone national and every state capital has been asked to put a figure in front of their city hall in solidarity.

Alaska, a farming capitol? It seems far-fetched, but it’s fast becoming a reality. In the last six years, a federal cost chare program through the USDA means giant greenhouses are popping up all over the state. Most of them can be spotted on the Kenai Peninsula. Listen now

The phrase “summer camp” usually brings to mind images of toasted marshmallows, campfires and wobbly canoe trips. Not bones. Listen now

You may have heard NPR’s Morning Edition running their “Unsung Museums” special this summer. Well it turns out Alaska has its fair share of them, including the hammer museum in Haines. Listen now

What’s less visible today than Orthodox crosses and golden cupolas are the Alaska Native belief systems that existed before European contact. KDLG’s Hannah Colton has this story about one Dena’ina man who came to embrace his traditional spirituality, and why he's choosing now to speak up about it. Listen now

Locals around Bristol Bay know the importance of subsistence fishing and the broader subsistence lifestyle. KDLG's Shaylon Cochran, having spent several years in Kenai, was somewhat familiar with what subsistence means. But has found this summer that the actual experience means a lot more once you’ve lived it. Listen now

What happens when five teenagers pile onto a research vessel and go island hopping through the Aleutians in the name of conservation? Science. Education. And maybe a peek into their futures. Listen now

The Tongass Rainforest isn’t what you’d picture as a candidate for farm country. The terrain is rugged, the soil unstable, and it rains over 100 inches a year. The vast majority of Sitkans get their meat and dairy products off a barge, shipped hundreds of miles. But Bobbi Daniels of the Sawmill Farm is determined to change that. Listen now

Bristol Bay is home to the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world. Over 132 years of commercial effort, now more than two billion salmon have been harvested from the Bay’s waters. In fact, the two billionth salmon was landed sometime, by someone, on July 6, 2016. Listen now

The rapid rise of "Pokemon Go" raises interesting issues about technology, discipline, and internet access across huge swaths of the state. Listen now

On the north shore of Lake Clark, there's a place called Kijik. It's the historic homeland of the Dena'ina Athabascans of the area, and also the site of a culture camp where youth and elders from the village of Nondalton came together last week. Listen now

Scattered across Alaska are 15 radar sites in some of the most remote areas of the state, feeding information to a command center in Anchorage. Keeping them humming 365 days a year are tiny crews of private contractors who live there for months at a time. To a lot of people, the prospect sounds crazy. To others the solitary rhythm makes total sense. Download Audio

In gay communities all over the country, there is a before and an after. A before June 12th, and an after. The shooting at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, killed 49 people and was the largest act of violence against the LGBTQ community in US History. And it happened as Pride events were taking place all over the country, including a reception at Juneau’s Northern Light Church mere hours before. Download Audio

Last week, the Nordic Ski Association of Anchorage (NSAA) was able to have summertime ski jumping at the Hilltop Ski Area. This is the first summer ski jump facility in the state. Download Audio

The extremely mild winter means bears have been out and about earlier than usual this year. So far, there’s already been two bear attacks in Southeast Alaska, and summer is just getting started. KCAW’s Brielle Schaeffer decided this was the perfect time to try her hand at bear spray. Download Audio

"Walk to Fisterra" is a new documentary film showing tonight in Fairbanks featuring Alaskan born cellist Dane Johansen walking over 500 miles carrying his cello on his back, playing the Bach Cello Suites along the Spanish pilgrimage to Carmino de Santiago. Johansen is the son of Fairbanks School of Talent Education founder and current Fairbanks Suzuki Institute Music Director Gail Johansen so learning a string instrument was almost a given in the Johansen household. Johansen picked up the cello when he was just 4 and as he grew in talent and stature, so did the weight and size of the cello which posed a few challenges as he trekked with tens of thousands of other pilgrims on the walk to Fisterra. Download Audio

Last week a group of scientists traveled to a small village in the Arctic to find as many different species as they could. It was happening all over the country in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the National Park Service. But it had special meaning in Anaktuvuk Pass, where the local Inupiaq people live a subsistence lifestyle inside of a national park. Download Audio

A new honor for the American bison.. it's now an official national mammal. Download Audio

Lunchtime options in downtown Anchorage have long been dominated by traditional brick-and-mortar restaurants, but now, hungry downtown diners will have some new options near the Park Strip, at a space that has been converted into a food truck forum for the newly-minted K Street Eats. Download Audio