A new Juneau-based comedy troupe called Club Baby Seal is gaining momentum in the capital city. Listen now

With a new year often comes the resolution to be well. Do good work. Keep in touch. Sound familiar? That’s the famous outro to the daily “Writer’s Almanac,” hosted by legendary writer and radio host Garrison Keillor. He visited Alaska last year on a cruise and made a pit stop in Sitka to visit a pen pal. Because it turns out, when it comes to resolutions, Keillor is good on his word. Listen now
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This week on AK... Our favorite segments from 2016! Listen Now

If you’ve ever flown home for the holidays you know it’s no easy feat-- with everything from weather delays to wailing infants. But what’s it like to travel with a companion that’s more than 100 years old and could explode at any moment? KCAW’s Emily Russell flew home for the holidays with a living, breathing, centuries-old jar of sourdough starter and has the story. Listen Now

Aztec dancers whirled, while drums beat and a guitar-backed chorus sang Spanish hymns in praise of La Senora de Guadalupe. The pre-dawn celebration honors Mexico's patron saint, and even in frozen Alaska, the tradition warms up a December morning. Listen Now

When you think about an elementary school music class, a choir might come to mind. The students sing choral standards with their teacher standing in front, or backing them up on piano. But these days, some of those classes are different. In Juneau, one music teacher has hundreds of kids playing guitars, mandolins, ukuleles and banjos – together, as a band. Listen Now

Knowing how to assemble a whale skeleton is a rare skill. For a small group of students at Kachemak Bay Campus of Kenai Peninsula College in Homer, rebuilding skeletons is all in a day’s work. Listen Now

November is Native American Heritage Month. To celebrate, we’re taking you down the catwalk and into the heart of contemporary Native fashion. From seal skin corsets to gowns fringed like Eagle feathers, today’s designers are finding new silhouettes for traditional art. And their customers love it. Listen Now

Every November, the community gathers for its Wild Foods Potluck, bringing together family and friends from near and far. Listen Now 

The Fairbanks Four’s release from prison last year inspired virtuoso Emerson Eads to compose a piece titled “Mass for the Oppressed.” Eads has lined up some impressive talent to perform the piece next month, and he’s arranged for proceeds from sales of the production to go to an organization that represented the four Alaska Native men in court. Listen Now

Gerry’s Barbershop has been around for nearly three decades in Juneau. Listen Now

There's only one national park in America where some of the Rangers are canines: Denali National Park. In the summers, the dogs serve as ambassadors, but during the winter months, they ferry researchers and park employees through areas closed to motorized vehicles. Listen Now

People have come to Fairbanks from all over the state to sell their handmade goods during the Alaska Federation of Native Conference this week. At the craft fair, you can find everything from ivory carvings and hand-made masks to mukluks, kuspuks and even kippered salmon. With few available jobs in the villages, these handicrafts and homemade foods are one of the few ways people pay their bills. Listen Now

Museums are usually a place for appreciating art that will be around for centuries. But earlier this month, the Anchorage Museum hosted a ceremony to burn ten beautiful Alaska Native masks. The artists who created the masks wanted to inspire community conversations about illness and healing. Listen Now

Bethel sits on a river, but many people here don’t know how to swim. People drown in the Kuskokwim every year, and for decades people thought the solution was to build a pool and teach people to swim. Well, two years ago the city got a pool. But how do you build a swim culture where one has never existed? That’s a question Bethel’s first swim team is trying to answer. Listen Now

The world's best choir is planning a free concert in Anchorage Oct. 4 and 5. The Gracias Choir and Orchestra brings a bit of Christmas flavor to Alaska in October, and the family-friendly show depends on a network of enthusiastic volunteers to make it happen. Listen now
(Photo by Scott Burton/KTOO)

A new plywood cut-out of a person in front of city hall is part of a national effort to bring awareness to homelessness. The social art project began in Charleston, South Carolina where the city collaborated with a design firm to create 430 plywood figures—the estimated number of homeless people in the city at the time. The figures were then placed in park in front of their City Hall. Now, the project has gone national and every state capital has been asked to put a figure in front of their city hall in solidarity.

Alaska, a farming capitol? It seems far-fetched, but it’s fast becoming a reality. In the last six years, a federal cost chare program through the USDA means giant greenhouses are popping up all over the state. Most of them can be spotted on the Kenai Peninsula. Listen now

The phrase “summer camp” usually brings to mind images of toasted marshmallows, campfires and wobbly canoe trips. Not bones. Listen now

You may have heard NPR’s Morning Edition running their “Unsung Museums” special this summer. Well it turns out Alaska has its fair share of them, including the hammer museum in Haines. Listen now