Alaska's Energy Desk

Alaska's Energy Desk is a team of six reporters covering energy and environment in Alaska. We produce in-depth enterprise reporting for radio, video and web. The team is a collaboration between Alaska Public Media in Anchorage, KTOO in Juneau and KUCB in Unalaska and supported with a grant from CPB.

ConocoPhillips hasn't found a buyer for its liquefied natural gas plant on the Kenai Peninsula. Now, a company spokesperson said it’s going to save expenses by mothballing the facility this fall. Listen now

Back in 1970 on July 19, it snowed 9.7 inches at the Summit weather station just south of Cantwell on the Parks Highway. Listen now

Southcentral Alaska’s only gas supplier wants to boost residential bills by 4.6 percent to pay for mostly infrastructure investments. Listen now

After five months of back and forth, the legislature may be close to compromising on changes to the state’s oil and gas tax credit system. Listen now

Diane Schenker had recently graduated from Reed College and was living in Fairbanks when she heard a rumor that Welding Union 798 had been forced to hire women to help build the trans-Alaska pipeline. A 21-year-old with no experience in construction, Schenker convinced the union office manager to let her work with an all-male crew of welders from the South. Listen now

With the pipeline turning 40, a look back at how Big Green fought Big Oil, how that fight transformed the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, and why Congress ever agreed to it.

You could argue — and a lot of people do — that Alaska would be a completely different place if it weren’t for a man named Tom Marshall.

Hilcorp snapped up more than 100,000 acres in Cook Inlet for additional oil and gas development at federal and state lease sales held Wednesday. Listen now

Alaskans will celebrate the summer solstice at 8:24 tonight. The solstice is the point when the sun’s rays reach their highest latitude of the year. And also the moment when the days start getting shorter. Listen now

An Alaskan has been appointed to help manage fisheries nationwide. Listen now

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is reshuffling several senior government positions, and it could affect Arctic policies in Alaska. Listen now

There aren't many volcanoes like Bogoslof. But with an improved monitoring network, scientists are relishing every last eruption. Listen now

The North Slope community of Deadhorse is an unusual place. Its No. 1 purpose is to serve the oil field its next to: Prudhoe Bay. There are no houses, there's no downtown and no parks; just a series of industrial lots and gravel roads in the middle of the tundra. But Deadhorse does have a store. And the man who runs it is retiring this month, after 42 years. Listen now

"We’re responsible for these lands," Central Council President Richard Peterson said. Listen now

Fairbanks hit 90 degrees last week for the first time in four years. The heat was very localized to the Tanana and Yukon river valleys. We asked Brian Brettschneider, with our Ask a Climatologist segment, which areas of Alaska usually see the hottest temperatures in the summer. He says the warmest temperatures are almost always found in the Interior.

Abraham Ellis is with the Sandia National Labs in New Mexico. “We are interested in those technologies to figure out ways to improve the energy resilience for cities,” he said. “For defense applications, and things like that, that really need to keep on going with electricity supply, even if the normal grid fails for whatever reason.”

The study says wild red salmon are affected more by adult hatchery-raised pink salmon that compete with reds or eat them when they're small. And the research also says herring declines are more related to increased fresh water from melting glaciers, rather than oil inundation after the spill.

Wildfire season is off to a slow start in Alaska. But that could change very quickly. That’s because predicting how severe a wildfire season will be in the state is so tricky. Alaska’s Energy Desk is checking in with climatologist Brian Brettschneider each week as part of the segment, Ask a Climatologist. Brettschneider says over the entire season, which runs through the end of July, no wildfire forecast is useful for Alaska.

Caelus Energy, the company behind what could be Alaska's biggest oil discovery since the 1960s, will not be drilling a well to confirm the find this winter, as originally planned.

The state is proposing a $380,000 fine for Alaska Native corporation Ahtna, Inc., for safety violations at a gas well near Glennallen. Listen now