"Walk to Fisterra" is a new documentary film showing tonight in Fairbanks featuring Alaskan born cellist Dane Johansen walking over 500 miles carrying his cello on his back, playing the Bach Cello Suites along the Spanish pilgrimage to Carmino de Santiago. Johansen is the son of Fairbanks School of Talent Education founder and current Fairbanks Suzuki Institute Music Director Gail Johansen so learning a string instrument was almost a given in the Johansen household. Johansen picked up the cello when he was just 4 and as he grew in talent and stature, so did the weight and size of the cello which posed a few challenges as he trekked with tens of thousands of other pilgrims on the walk to Fisterra. Download Audio

Last week a group of scientists traveled to a small village in the Arctic to find as many different species as they could. It was happening all over the country in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the National Park Service. But it had special meaning in Anaktuvuk Pass, where the local Inupiaq people live a subsistence lifestyle inside of a national park. Download Audio

A new honor for the American bison.. it's now an official national mammal. Download Audio

Lunchtime options in downtown Anchorage have long been dominated by traditional brick-and-mortar restaurants, but now, hungry downtown diners will have some new options near the Park Strip, at a space that has been converted into a food truck forum for the newly-minted K Street Eats. Download Audio

Bristol Bay artist Apayo Moore has painted murals in Anchorage and Juneau. Moore recently received a grant from the state’s “Percent for Arts” program to paint two 60-foot murals that will be shipped up to Bethel in the fall to be installed in the youth detention center there.

How do you begin to cope with the death of your child? J.T. Lindholm is answering that question, in part, by organizing a triathlon this summer.

Kwigillingok is preventing kids from entering foster care by intervening with families before abuse starts. Meet their Child Protection Team. Download Audio

Where ya gonna go when looking for a professional dance group to demonstrate the intricacies of traditional Indian dance? Russia, of course. Or that's what the Asian Alaskan Cultural Center did to bring Mayuri, a group of twenty or so young dancers, to Anchorage. The the troupe performed for high schools this week and for the public Friday evening at the Alaska Performing Arts Center.

Warmer winters have pushed Sitka snowboarders and other adventurers out of the mountains and into the water. The ocean swell and rock breaks right near the heart of town create prime wave conditions. But locals are worried about revealing too much about what their secret spot. Download Audio

The Alaska Folk Festival runs April 4th through 10th in Juneau. It’s a sure sign of spring for the hundreds of musicians from all over the state who come to play, jam and listen. CoastAlaska’s Ed Schoenfeld caught up with a Juneau singer-songwriter. He’s one of many performers who are serious about their music, but don’t leave their day jobs. Download Audio

It’s not rare to see mushers touting various brands and companies as they drive their dog teams down the Iditarod trail. Sponsorship is a major source of financial support. This year a few mushers have gotten involved in touting political candidates as both the congressional and presidential election season heats up. Download Audio
Mason (left) and Jazzmyne (right) Balison outside the Alaska Public Media studios. (Photo by Anne Hillman/KSKA)

A year ago, we first heard from a young couple who were trying to overcome their addictions to methamphetamines. Their strategy was to move away from Anchorage and try to start over in Wasilla because being around friends who were still using made it much too hard. They ended up back in Anchorage when they lost their housing, but despite their challenges, the couple is still sober. And now, they've entered a new chapter. Download Audio
Zane Henning, a friend of Greg Davis, with Backer’s Island in the background. (Photo by Quinton Chandler/KBBI)

Over the last eight years, a California man has snatched up dozens of parcels of land in the small community of Seldovia, on Kachemak Bay. His work on that property has dragged him into legal disputes with the city of Seldovia and some of his neighbors. Download audio
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Under most circumstances, being trapped in a small room with a countdown clock would be a bit nerve-wracking, but a new business in Talkeetna aims to make it fun. Trapped in Talkeetna is a live escape room experience, where a team of players has one hour to solve a puzzle in order to escape. KTNA’s Phillip Manning and his team tried their hand at solving the puzzle – and talked with the owners about why they decided to open Alaska’s first escape room. Download audio
Alan Zuboff comes to these Angoon flats almost every day to dig for cockles. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins – KTOO)

Earlier this month, Angoon’s mayor asked for help after discovering high levels of mercury in subsistence seal. With only one grocery store in town, the small Southeast village is dependent on what’s in the water. And according to a tissue sample test, that might include contaminants from a nearby mine. Download Audio

If you've ever wanted to feed a snow leopard, a moose, or a pack of wolves, this year you've got a chance. Albeit, for a tidy sum. It's part of the special programming that helps keep cultural institutions in Alaska afloat during the long, lean winter months. Download Audio
Kyle Reading prepares a batch of Flintlock beard oil. (Photo by Josh Edge/APRN)

Two local musicians in Anchorage are diving beards-first into the business of male grooming products. They're going for a style reminiscent of Don Draper mixed with well-groomed mountain man. I spent an afternoon at company – or apartment kitchen – headquarters to find out a little bit more. Download Audio

As 2015 came to a close, Juneau artist MK MacNaughton finished a art project that portrayed 52 of her fellow community members—or, a portrait a week for a year. MacNaughton picked her subjects not for how they look, but for what they do, where they do it, and how hard they work at it. Download Audio

About 30 miles north of Haines, there’s a sanctuary for abandoned wildlife, big and small. Steve Kroschel has owned and operated Kroschel’s Wildlife Center for decades. He’s been dubbed the wildlife whisperer. Even the wolverines – compact killing machines capable of handily taking down an adult moose – play with Kroschel like he’s one of the pack. Despite appearances, there's a method to his madness. Download Audio:

UAA linguistics Professor David Bowie -- pronounced BOO-wee, but spelled b-o-w-i-e -- has a vexed relationship with the celebrity he shares his name with. He resented the musician until he was in his 20s, when something changed. Download Audio: