Alaska Politics

Political news coverage from the Alaska Public Radio Network.

U.S. Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, speaks at a Native Issues Forum in Juneau, April 5, 2016. (Photo by Skip Gray/360 North)

Donald Trump may be the leading Republican candidate for president, but Alaska Congressman Don Young is no fan. He blames "the people" for "following a pied piper over the edge of the cliff."

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch has declined to let the Alaska Department of Law act as federal prosecutors to pursue sex-trafficking charges against the once-powerful owner of oilfield services company VECO.

North Slope Borough voters have voted in favor of recalling Borough Mayor Charlotte Brower.

Upsets over financing for school capital projects and a tax-cap calculation will leave Administration with budget challenges, though more liberal-leaning Assembly. Download Audio

Live coverage for the 2016 Anchorage Municipal Election from Alaska Public Media.

Representative Kurt Olson, a Soldotna Republican developed a plan to tax Permanent Fund dividends back in February. But he didn’t introduce it at the time, because he wanted to see how the debate over plans from Governor Bill Walker and others unfolded. Download Audio

Four nominees to replace an outgoing state Supreme Court justice have been submitted to Governor Bill Walker for review. Walker now has about six weeks to name replacement on the bench. Download Audio

Congressman Don Young called on Juneau Republicans to support legislative funding for John Sturgeon’s legal fight over operating a hovercraft in a national preserve. Young also says that while he’s running for re-election, when the time comes for a successor, Alaskans should choose someone who’s young. Download Audio

Senators have amended a bill that would overhaul Alaska’s criminal justice system, taking steps that makes it more difficult for those convicted of sex crimes from benefiting from the bill’s provisions. Download Audio
A passenger on the deck of an Alaska Marine Highway ferry. (Flickr Creative Commons – supafly)

A Southeast lawmaker wants communities to be able to contribute directly to the Alaska Marine Highway System. Download Audio
Gov. Bill Walker’s plan to fund state operations with Permanent Fund earnings is up for public comment before the Senate State Affairs Committee. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)

Governor Bill Walker's plan to solve the state's 4 billion dollar budget deficit has it all- budget cuts, new taxes and lower Permanent Fund Dividend payments in the years ahead. But his approach has plenty of critics in the legislature. What do you think? Join host Lori Townsend for a discussion on the state budget on the next Talk of Alaska statewide. Download Audio

The Air Force is expected to issue a final decision Monday on the basing of F-35 fighter jets at Eielson Air Force Base.

Many lawmakers say they never understood how the tax system would work at very low prices. But industry says this was always part of the deal. Download Audio

The state House passed a foster care improvement bill Friday afternoon. Under the new legislation, the state would put a stronger focus on finding foster kids permanent homes and prioritize placing them with relatives when possible. Download Audio

The state House unanimously passed a bill Friday morning that would create Indigenous Peoples Day on the 18th of October every year and Katie John Day on May 31. Download Audio

The state government would buy the Legislative Information Office in downtown Anchorage for $32.5 million, under a recommendation made Thursday night by the Legislative Council. Download Audio

A Facebook confrontation between an Alaska Democratic Party superdelegate and a young Bernie Sanders supporter has gone viral. It’s become a lightening rod for Sanders supporters. It's also a replay of an internal party struggle that's gone on for a century. Download Audio

What the Legislature does in response to the state government’s $4 billion deficit could have big effects on Alaska’s economy, according to a leading economist. Download Audio

Senate Bill 91, the omnibus crime bill, is working its way through the Senate Finance Committee. In its current form, it would save the state about $150 million over the next five years, but advocates say it will only make the community safer if most of that is reinvested. Download Audio

Senators introduced four new bills Monday that would require local governments and schools to pay more for pensions, end two college scholarship programs, and cut the amount that municipalities receive in state funding. Download Audio