anchorage land use map

Municipality of Anchorage planners are engaged in a project that could outline how the city will look in 20 years. In the meantime, Anchorage neighborhoods are changing. Throughout the past decade, the city has seen growth that has brought forth new challenges. This week, a team of presenters has been hosting informational sessions around town on the Anchorage Bowl Land Use Plan Map Update. On this week's Alaska Edition, these presenters will fill us in on how the community can further this discussion.

With the current budget bottleneck in the state legislature, there is both good and bad news for communities. Some bills that would have increased costs for local governments are on the shelf this session, while there is certainty that communities statewide will be receiving less revenue sharing. While lawmakers struggle to close the budget gap, most headlines are focused on the big picture. But what about the small screen? On this week's Alaska Edition we'll take a look at how the state's fiscal crisis is translating in small town Alaska. Listen Now:

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. On this week's Alaska Edition, we look at the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, or ACEs study, and the link between childhood trauma and health issues later in life. Studies have shown that these experiences lead to a wide variety of problems including asthma, cancer and arthritis. The good news is that research show that these effects can be reversed.
Ethan Berkowitz. (Photo by Josh Edge, APRN - Anchorage)

Voters headed to the polls on Tuesday in Anchorage to cast their votes for assembly seats, school board members and a number of ballot issues. Ellen Lockyer discusses what the outcome means for Anchorage on this week's Alaska Edition.
Cannabis Plant. (Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

This week on Alaska Edition, we are discussing the pot industry in the state. Listen Now:
Mouhcine Guettabi discusses the legislative session on Alaska Edition.

Alaska's legislative session is underway. Alaska Edition host, Ellen Lockyer, checks in on some of the big news actions. Listen Now:
reporter's roundtable super tuesday

Republican voters in 12 states went to the polls to indicate which of the Republican candidates they want for the 2016 presidential race. On this week's Alaska Edition, we review the results of the Republican poll, and what impact Alaska's support may or may not have on a national level. Listen Now:

This week the University of Alaska's annual sustainable agriculture conference brought together farmers, livestock producers and other major players in the agriculture community to discuss the future of the industry in Alaska. On this week's Alaska Edition, we'll look at some of the innovations in agriculture that have taken place in the state over the past few years as well as the opportunity for buying locally and food security throughout the state. Listen Now:
Reporter's roundtable update on energy

Listen Now: On this week's Alaska Edition we discuss energy in Alaska, where bush residents have not seen prices drop for gasoline or diesel fuel, even though gas is a little more than $2 a gallon in Anchorage.

The number of nonresident workers in Alaska surpassed the number of residential workers in 2014. What's causing this statistic and what can be done to encourage local hiring within the state? This week's Alaska Edition tackles these questions and looks at the legality of policies aiming to increase the number of Alaskan workers. Listen Now:

Governor Walker recently announced Dean Williams as the new commissioner of the Department of Corrections. This week on Alaska Edition we will talk about the future of the Department of Corrections and the steps the new commissioner plans to take to better the system. Listen Now:

On this week's Alaska Edition, we discuss emergency preparedness in the state.

The Legislative session started this week, and battles are already brewing over the budget, several pre-filed bills ranging in relevance. This week's Alaska Edition explores what's ahead this session and how it stacks up to previous years.

Human Trafficking tends to be closely associated with sex trafficking and prostitution, but this week's Alaska Edition includes guests who are taking initiative to expand how Alaskans understand the issue of people being exploited across an array of industries. Listen Now:

Whether it’s viral videos about kayak-eating bears, or footage of alleged police brutality--some of Alaska’s biggest stories in the last year started as clips on social media. This week's Alaska Edition looks at how video and new media are shaping the way we get our news. Listen Now:

This summer Alaskans dealt with some of the most aggressive wildfires in the state's history--right under the 2004 fires. For the last Alaska Edition of 2015, Ellen Lockyer revisits this major news event to discuss key elements that added fuel to this fire and takes a look at the aftermath.

On Wednesday, Governor Bill Walker introduced a budget proposal. It includes taxes, changing the structure of the Permanent Fund, and further cuts to services across the state. And all of this just a few weeks ahead of the next session.

State and federal officials as well as community groups spread all over Alaska have expressed alarm over rising rates of use and abuse. Juneau in particular has been the subject has gotten attention lately for a spate of heroin and opiate related overdoses. KSKA: Fri., Nov. 20, at 2:00 p.m. & Sat., Nov. 21, at 6:00 p.m. KAKM: Fri., Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m. & Sat., Nov. 21, at 6:00 p.m. Download Audio:

The Alaska LNG special session came to a close last week. It was the third special session held this year. Zachariah Hughes hosts a reporter's roundtable diving into the complex issues surround the LNG project. What decisions came out of this session? And what exactly does this mean for Alaska? Listen Now:

What impacts might the closing of rural schools have on the state? Influential members of the Legislature have started talking about possibly raising the state’s minimum number of students it takes to keep qualify for state education funding. Currently, that number is ten students. Advocates say that with the state facing a dire revenues shortfall, the state needs to reconsider how it pays for education. Critics say the change could close more than sixty schools in small communities, disproportionately hurting rural Alaskans for the sake of short-term savings. Listen now: