Alcohol can be a fun addition to a gathering, but it can also be disastrous if not used responsibly. Alaska has a difficult relationship with alcohol and the holiday season can be tough for people trying to stay sober or limit their intake. Listen Now

A new book by former public radio GM for KOTZ and KSKA, Dr. Alex Hills, tells the story of the early days of telecommunications in rural Alaska. What it took to connect the villages and who was doing the work. The book is called Finding Alaska’s Village: And Connecting Them and author Alex Hills will be on hand to discuss it. Listen Now

Lisa Murkowski has been one of Alaska’s U.S. Senators since she was appointed to the position in 2002. She’s a veteran of both state and national politics and is running for retention for the third time. She will be the final candidate on Talk of Alaska for this election cycle. Listen Now

Ray Metcalfe is in the mix of candidates vying for incumbent Lisa Murkowski’s U.S. Senate seat. He’s spent years working to draw attention to political corruption within state government. He worked in the legislature as a Republican and now he’s running as a Democrat, but has told the state party, he doesn’t want their help. Listen Now

Six years ago Joe Miller won the primary for U.S. Senate as a Republican but lost the general election. He's running now as a Libertarian. Why is the Fairbanks attorney running for Senate under another party? What would he focus on if Alaskans vote to send him to Congress? We'll ask when Libertarian candidate Joe Miller is our guest on the next Talk of Alaska. Listen Now

Steve Lindbeck is running against Don Young for Alaska’s lone U.S. House position. Lindbeck is a first time candidate. He's worked for non-profits for decades including as General Manager of Alaska Public Media. We’ll find out what he would work to achieve if Alaskans decide to send him to Washington. Listen Now

Margaret Stock is running as an Independent for U.S. Senate. The first time candidate says she will promote a strong national defense and support military veterans. She’s also pro-choice. She is the first in a series of candidates we’ll feature on TOA over the next few weeks. Listen Now

Learning from the past helps inform the future. Clive Thomas’s new book on policy, people and the institutions that helped create the political structure of Alaska is an exhaustive examination of topics such as the state’s constitution and how it differs from others, being an owner state, the politics of lobbying, the federal relationship, transportation, economic realities, state courts and a wide range of political issues. I do mean wide range. The book is more than 1200 pages and weighs 5 pounds! Listen Now
wooden mask

Yupik carver Drew Michael and painter Elizabeth Ellis created 5 foot tall masks in an exhibit called ‘Aggravated Organisms’ to represent the 10 most prevalent diseases impacting Alaskans. After 3 years of touring the masks to Alaska communities across the state and a showing in Seattle, Michael has decided to end the educational journey of these masks through the traditional method of burning. The ceremony will be held on the lawn of the Anchorage museum. At the same time, Michael plans to put out a statewide call to promote healing through community cohesiveness and mutual support. Listen now
Palmer Jr. Middle School 7th grader, Shania Sommer, 12, announced the amount of the 2015 Permanent Fund Dividend. (Photo by Josh Edge, APRN - Anchorage)

What was the original intent of the Alaska Permanent Fund? A rainy day savings account for Government funding after oil was depleted or a fund to pay citizens a dividend and subsidize programs? What happens if the fund is drawn down to help shore up budget shortfalls? We’ll discuss a UAF course designed to answer these questions with former state government officials who were there during the early days.

Alaska's immigrant population is growing at a faster rate than almost any other place in the nation, and most of the people who arrive in the state are of working age. Immigrants are starting new businesses, paying taxes, and helping build our local economies. On the next Talk of Alaska we'll talk about the contributions of foreign-born Alaskans and the challenges they face when starting a life here. Listen Now

More than two dozen murders have taken place in Anchorage since the beginning of the year. APD reports that of the 15 homicides since June, six were engaged in drugs or other criminal activity. Four were domestic violence killings. Five were in isolated areas of the city in the late evening/early morning hours, prompting APD to caution citizens to “Be extra aware of their surroundings and to report any suspicious person or activity to police.” The long message also says, “If you plan to be out late at night, make sure you travel with several friends and not alone.” Listen Now
Jim Johnsen at a meet and greet in Juneau, July 7, 2015. Johnsen is a candidate for University of Alaska president. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)

The pinch of state budget cuts is being felt across the state. How will these impacts affect Alaska University system campuses, especially the smaller campuses? What can the university system do to build in sustainability and long term fiscal stability? Listen Now

The village of Shishmaref voted to move their village and along the coast of Alaska, discussions are taking place about how to adapt to survive into the future. Workshops designed to move beyond studying change to look for solutions within communities are happening and our guest host will lead the discussion about their findings. Listen Now
A fast-moving storm is set to move through the Copper River Basin, Mat-Su, Anchorage and the Northern Kenai Peninsula in the evening of Thursday, 6/30/16. (Image courtesy National Weather Service)

There was a lot of concern about a big fire season this summer after a winter of very low snow fall and a dry spring. There were some burns but the season was not remarkable for fire, it was more of note for hot temps, then rainfall, mudslides and flooding. El Nino is getting to the geriatric stage and La Nina may be moving in. What will that mean for the next 6 months? We’ll talk to the climate experts and find out. Listen Now

Wind impacts everything from seed distribution to powering light bulbs. In the fascinating, deep dive tradition of his first two best-selling books ‘Cold’ and ‘Heat’, author Bill Streever examines all aspects of moving air in his latest book, ‘And Soon I Heard a Roaring Wind.’

Opioid abuse and addiction is a national crisis and Alaska is suffering the impacts of prescription and illegal drug problems right along with the rest of the country. An upcoming summit on opioid abuse will take place in Palmer next week and the nation’s top Health and Veterans officials will be here for it. Listen Now

Governor Walker’s plans for overhauling the system of funding state government has met with resistance from lawmakers and the public. Lawmakers are unhappy with his vetoes and cuts to the PFD but they haven’t mustered an override and they haven’t passed a fiscal plan. What can possibly break the divide between the Governor’s plans and the desires of lawmakers and the public? Listen Now

In the wake of more police shootings of black men, the attacks in Dallas, and subsequent protests nationwide, including in Alaska, the time is ripe to have an open conversation about race and law enforcement in Alaska. Though we’ll be talking specifically about the Black Lives Matter movement, you can’t talk about these topics without touching on the disproportionate number of Alaska Native men who are incarcerated and why that happens. Download Audio

From hydroponic basil grown in an Anchorage café basement, to high-tunnel green houses in Homer, to hot-springs heated tomato farms in Fairbanks to local produce at the base of Brooks Range, climate change, technology, government grants and a greater interest in local food are changing agriculture in Alaska. Download Audio