2 Homer delegates among Alaskans at Democratic National Convention

Homer resident Taz Tally is one of 20 delegates representing Alaska at the Democratic National Convention underway in Philadelphia. He says it is an honor to represent the state.

A selfie taken by Homer resident Taz Tally with with the other Alaska delegate from Homer, Diana iana Carbonell at the National Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. (Photo Courtesy of Taz Tally)
A selfie taken by Homer resident Taz Tally with the other Alaska delegate from Homer, Diana Carbonell, at the National Democratic Convention in Philadelphia.
(Photo Courtesy of Taz Tally)

“Well, it is an honor and it is pretty darn exciting to be here in Philly to represent Alaska,” Tally said.

The 65-year-old says the mood is festive but also a bit tense.

“You know people walking around with their Hillary pins and shirts and their Bernie buttons and they’re kind of eyeing each other and they’re trying to say hello,” Tally laughed.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ plea for his supporters to rally behind presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton was met with boos today.

Florida Rep. and DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is under fire after leaked emails showed Democratic National Committee officials discussing ways to help Clinton defeat Sanders in the Democratic primaries.

The controversy led to an announcement that she would resign after the convention.

Tally said the delegates are talking about the emails that Wikileaks released but they are also preparing to get down to business.

A photo taken by Homer resident Taz Tally who is serving as a delegate for Alaska at the National Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. (Photo Courtesy of Taz Tally
A photo taken by Homer resident Taz Tally, who is serving as a delegate for Alaska at the National Democratic Convention in Philadelphia.

“Yes, indeed, I think there’s plenty of talk about that,” Tally said. “There are basically two kinds of things going on. The convention is moving towards nominating Hillary and there are all the events towards that, but there are also a lot of Bernie events going on because Bernie’s revolution is continuing.”

Tally said the most important thing is for the Bernie supporters to feel they have some say moving forward. He said although the platform is set, Bernie supporters can still have an impact on the future of the party.

“If the folks who are running the Democratic convention do what happened at the Republican convention — that is, don’t allow votes to occur, don’t allow the roll call votes to occur on party plan items, those kinds of things, if they don’t allow Bernie’s voice to be heard —  then I think there’s a lot more likelihood that some of these folks, not only at the convention, but nationwide, go to the Green Party or go to Donald Trump, because the issues are not so much policy-driven as they are independence-driven,” Tally said.

Tally is one of two Alaska delegates to the Democratic National Convention from the Homer area. The other is Diana Carbonell.

Tally said the Alaska delegates are wearing matching bright blue kuspuks with gold thread, so they should be easy to spot.

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Daysha Eaton, KMXT - Kodiak
Daysha Eaton is a contributor with the Alaska Public Radio Network. Daysha Eaton holds a B.A. from Evergreen State College, and a M.A. from the University of Southern California. Daysha got her start in radio at Seattle public radio stations, KPLU and KUOW. Before coming to KBBI, she was the News Director at KYUK in Bethel. She has also worked as the Southcentral Reporter for KSKA in Anchorage. Daysha's work has appeared on NPR's "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered", PRI's "The World" and "National Native News". She's happy to take assignments, and to get news tips, which are best sent via email. Daysha became a journalist because she believes in the power of storytelling. Stories connect us and they help us make sense of our world. They shed light on injustice and they comfort us in troubled times. She got into public broadcasting because it seems to fulfill the intention of the 4th Estate and to most effectively apply the freedom of the press granted to us through the Constitution. She feels that public radio has a special way of moving people emotionally through sound, taking them to remote places, introducing them to people they would not otherwise meet and compelling them to think about issues they might ordinarily overlook.