Tundra Vision presents: The Story of an Alaskero

While conducting research in Seattle, Diane Rodill came across a 1915 photograph of her father, Denis, participating in a 4th of July celebration at a salmon cannery in Larsen Bay, Alaska. She had no idea what he was doing there, how he got there, how and when he left and why he was wearing a dress! Listen as Dr. Rodill shares her remarkable story of her “rascal” father and his experience as a Filipino cannery worker, and “Alaskero”. She will discuss how she discovered this story and approached it as both a self-taught historian and a daughter. She’ll also share how solving her father’s silent immigration story impacted her own identity as a Filipina – and an American.

LISTEN HERE

GUESTS:

  • Diane Rodill is an emerging Seattle writer. She received a PhD from Temple University in 1984, and was a Peace Corps Volunteer/ Philippines 1985-1987. Her work has appeared in historical journals, bulletins, blogs, newspapers, radio interviews, social media, Peace Corps Worldwide, and Wing Luke and NYC Tenement Museums’ Your Story Our Story. Her pending historical biography, A Filipino Rascal, is her debut book. 

LINKS:

 

RECORDED: Thursday, October 26, 2017 at Mountain View Community Room.

About

Addressing Alaskans features local lectures and forums recorded at public events taking place in Southcentral Alaska. A variety of local organizations host speakers addressing topics that matter to Alaskans. To let us know about an upcoming community event that you would like to hear on Addressing Alaskans, please Contact Us with details.

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Eric Bork, or you can just call him “Bork” because everybody else does, is the Audio Media Content Producer for KSKA-FM. He produces and edits episodes of Outdoor Explorer, Addressing Alaskans, as well as a few other programs. He also maintains the web posts for those shows and many others on alaskapublic.org. You can sometimes hear him filling in for Morning Edition or find him operating the sound board for any of the live broadcast programs. After escaping the Detroit area when he was 18, Bork made it up to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where he earned a degree in Communications/Radio Broadcasting from Northern Michigan University. He spent time managing the college radio station, working for the local NPR affiliate and then in top 40 radio in Michigan before coming to Alaska to work his first few summers. After then moving to Chicago, it only took five years to convince him to move back to Alaska in 2010. When not involved in great radio programming he’s probably riding a bicycle, thinking about riding bicycles, dreaming about bikes, reading a book or planning the next place he’ll travel to. Only two continents left to conquer!