Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2017

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State approves ExxonMobil’s expansion plan for Point Thomson, ending months-long fight

Rashah McChesney, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Juneau

Gov. Walker approves approves ExxonMobil’s plan to explore expansion of the massive Point Thomson gas field.

Fairbanks police, state troopers fatally shoot man

Associated Press

Alaska State Troopers say police shot and killed a man near a major intersection in Fairbanks on Christmas Eve.

Police: Trooper shoots armed man in back of patrol car

Associated Press

Alaska State Troopers say a man was shot while in the back of a patrol car after he pointed a handgun at a trooper.

Tax appeal challenges Alaska’s fish landing tax

Jacob Resneck, KTOO – Juneau

A dispute over a fishing company’s tax bill is challenging Alaska’s fisheries resource landing tax on constitutional grounds. The landing tax is crucial for fishing dependent communities that receive half the revenue.

Unalaska’s fire chief says he was forced to resign

Zoe Sobel, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Unalaska

Unalaska’s Fire Chief says he was forced to resign Friday and less than 24 hours later put on a plane to the Lower 48.

BSAR asks surrounding villages, own members for help responding to nightly alcohol emergencies

Anna Rose MacArthur, KYUK – Bethel

It’s the second winter since Bethel opened a liquor store, and the demand on Bethel Search and Rescue to help people who’ve been drinking has more than doubled since last year. It’s been a challenge for the all-volunteer organization to keep up with demand. They are looking for more members and hoping that some of the surrounding villages will help.

‘Let them talk!’ Iconic political figure Jack Coghill urges collegiality among legislators

Tim Ellis, KUAC – Fairbanks

The Legislature has faced seemingly impossible challenges over the years, according to Jack Coghill, who spent decades as a lawmaker in the Territorial House and state Senate. The 92-year-old Nenana Republican visited Fairbanks earlier this month to talk about his life and career – and offer some advice to lawmakers.

Rural Alaska losing access to fisheries, report says

Berett Wilber, KHNS – Haines

The increasing costs to get into Alaska’s fisheries are making it difficult for new fishermen to break into the business — especially in rural, coastal communities.

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