Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, April 11, 2019

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Dunleavy says money set aside for Alaska schools is subject to veto. Lawmakers disagree.

Nathaniel Herz, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Anchorage

A new fight is erupting in Juneau about spending on Alaska’s public schools. It centers on whether Gov. Mike Dunleavy has the power to veto money state lawmakers set aside for schools last year, for the upcoming school year – a practice called “forward funding.”

Senators weigh splitting permanent fund draw between state and dividends — and limiting spending

Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO – Juneau

Alaska state senators are considering what would be the first change since the early 1980s to the formula for calculating permanent fund dividends. They’re also considering a new proposal to limit how much the state government spends. Changing dividends or spending will have major implications for the future of the state.

AG Barr to visit rural Alaska

Liz Ruskin, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Washington D.C.

A new fight is erupting in Juneau about spending on Alaska’s public schools. It centers on whether Gov. Mike Dunleavy has the power to veto money state lawmakers set aside for schools last year, for the upcoming school year – a practice called “forward funding.”

Experts say efforts by cruise ships to reduce air pollution may be causing water pollution instead

Jacob Resneck, CoastAlaska – Juneau

Over the past two years Alaska’s cruise ship inspectors called Ocean Rangers have documented a pattern of potentially serious water pollution. There’s been no apparent action by regulators, and Gov. Dunleavy’s administration wants to get rid of the inspectors.

Alleged head of 1488 gang moved to Washington ahead of trial

Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media- Anchorage

The alleged leader of a white-supremacist prison gang operating in Alaska is being sent out of state as he awaits trial.

Federal money for trails will no longer be shared with local communities by the state

Dan Bross, KUAC – Fairbanks

The state will no longer share federal trail money with Alaska communities. The Recreational Trails Program provides about $1.5 million to Alaska annually, money that has been split between state park and community projects, but the funding is being re-focused.

Two men admit to stealing, cutting up 10,000-year-old mammoth tusk

Casey Grove, Alaska Public Media – Anchorage

In Anchorage, the case of a 10,000-year-old stolen mammoth tusk is approaching its conclusion. But the tusk itself will not be coming home to the Campbell Creek Science Center.

Meet Alice Qannik Glenn, the podcaster who’s trying to get more young Alaska Native voices on the mic

Ravenna Koenig, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Fairbanks

If you look at the stories being told in the world, and you don’t see your perspective reflected in those stories, what do you do? For one young Iñupiaq woman, the answer to that question was: make a podcast.