Entomophagy: Eating insects

A photo of the Mt Sima Ski Area cafeteria counter; today’s lunch is BBQ Cricket Taco Tuesday! Photo by Adam Verrier.

On the next Outdoor Explorer, I’ll be talking about Entomophagy with Chris Gilberds, a chef from Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. Entomophagists are people who eat insects, and Chris Gilberds has a lot to say about why we should start incorporating more bugs into our diet. Insects provide lots of important nutrients and they can be harvested locally.

One note about this week’s show:  It was recorded spur of the moment, in the basement of Whitehorse’s local ski lodge at Mt. Sima. The acoustics of the room didn’t lend themselves to a high-quality recording environment, so the sound quality is somewhat lower than typical. Recorded live and in the moment!

HOSTS: Adam Verrier

GUESTS:

  • Chris Gilberds, a chef from Whitehorse, Yukon Territory

LINKS:

BROADCAST: Thursday, February 27th, 2020. 2:00 pm – 3:00 p.m. AKT

REPEAT BROADCAST:  Thursday, February 27th, 2020. 8:00 – 9:00 p.m. AKT

SUBSCRIBE: Receive Outdoor Explorer automatically every week via:

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Eric Bork, Alaska Public Media
Eric Bork, or you can just call him “Bork” because everybody else does, was the Audio Media Content Producer for KSKA-FM. He now produces and edits episodes of Outdoor Explorer, the Alaska focused outdoors program. He also maintains the web posts for that show. You may have heard him filling in for Morning Edition or All Things Considered and can still find him operating the sound board for any of the live broadcast programs. After escaping the Detroit area when he was 18, Bork made it up to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where he earned a degree in Communications/Radio Broadcasting from Northern Michigan University. He spent time managing the college radio station, working for the local NPR affiliate and then in top 40 radio in Michigan before coming to Alaska to work his first few summers. After then moving to Chicago, it only took five years to convince him to move back to Alaska in 2010. When not involved in great radio programming he’s probably riding a bicycle, thinking about riding bicycles, dreaming about bikes, reading a book or planning the next place he’ll travel to. Only two continents left to conquer!