Mu variant is fizzling in Alaska

A brown blob microscopic
A scanning electron micrograph shows a cell heavily infected with particles of SARS-COV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)

Alaska health officials say the mu variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 does not appear to be spreading in the state.

Jayme Parker at the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services said mu first showed up in Alaska in early May.

“We did see a lot of cases of mu but we’ve seen a really sharp decline since delta’s moved in,” she said last week.

Mu has caught the attention of the world’s virus trackers because its mutations might be able to evade immunity gained through vaccination and prior infection.

But in Alaska and other states, mu appears to be crowded out by the highly contagious delta variant.

In all, Alaska has recorded 147 cases of mu. Nearly all of them were in May, June and July.

Previous articlePrivate company to take over operations at Anchorage’s largest shelter
Next articleFormer Anchorage epidemiologist says mayor’s inability to help with rising COVID hospitalizations ‘doesn’t quite make sense’
Liz Ruskin covers Alaska issues in Washington as the network's D.C. correspondent. She was born in Anchorage and is a West High grad. She has degrees from the University of Washington and the University of Missouri School of Journalism in Columbia. She previously worked at the Homer News, the Anchorage Daily News and the Washington bureau of McClatchy Newspapers. She also freelanced for several years from the U.K. and Japan, in print and radio. Liz has been APRN’s Washington, D.C. correspondent since October 2013. She's @lruskin on Twitter. She welcomes your news tips at lruskin (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  | About Liz

No posts to display