Andrew Kitchenman, APRN & KTOO - Juneau

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Governor Bill Walker faces a potential campaign to recall him from office. Joe Miller backs the effort. He was the runner-up in the 2010 U.S. Senate campaign and 2014 Senate Republican primary. Listen now
Alaska News Nightly by Alaska Public Media

The Legislative Council voted today not to appeal a decision that upheld Governor Bill Walker’s action to expand Medicaid eligibility in the state. The vote ends the lawsuit less than a week after a separate court decision ruled that the House can’t take over the appeal from the council. Download Audio

Governor Bill Walker cut Permanent Fund dividends Wednesday to $1,000 per person, about half of the projected amount. The cut was one of a series of reductions that Walker made to lower the state's budget by $1.5 billion. Download Audio

Governor Walker announced Tuesday afternoon that Jahna Lindemuth would succeed Craig Richards as the Alaska Attorney General. Download Audio

The Legislature will gather in Juneau on July 11th for its second special session this year. But, it might not be there for long. Lawmakers are talking about adjourning in Juneau and calling the Legislature’s own special session in Anchorage. Download Audio

A judge ruled Friday the House can’t continue an appeal of Governor Bill Walker’s decision to expand Medicaid. This could be a fatal blow to the attempt to reverse the expansion. Download Audio

The survivors of law-enforcement officers and firefighters who die in the line of duty continue to face uncertainty over health insurance. That’s because the two houses of the Legislature couldn’t agree on a bill to provide benefits during the recent special session. Download Audio

Alaska’s Legislature will have another 30 days beginning on July 11th to pass a long-term fiscal plan for funding state government. That’s because Governor Bill Walker called them back for another special session. Download Audio

Gov. Bill Walker on Sunday called the Legislature back for another special session, after lawmakers failed to restructure Permanent Fund earnings.

A bill to restructure Permanent Fund earnings and cut fund dividends died in the House Finance Committee Friday. Download Audio

Alaskans’ Permanent Fund dividends would still be cut, but not as much, under a new version of a bill to restructure fund earnings. Download Audio

At a press conference in Juneau today, Gov. Bill Walker said he understands the position of legislators who are hearing from constituents opposed to cuts to Permanent Fund dividends. Download Audio

Public testimony leaned against Gov. Bill Walker’s proposal to draw on Permanent Fund earnings to pay for state government.

Since the Senate passed the bill last week that would draw money from the Permanent Fund to pay for state government, two things have happened. One is that many Alaskans have raised concerns with the part of the bill that would cut Permanent Fund dividends in half,( from $2,000 to $1,000). The other is that the bill was sent to the House, where it’s having a harder time moving. In fact, it might not even get out of the Finance Committee. Download Audio

The bill that would cut Alaskans’ Permanent Fund dividend checks in half this fall faces a tough legislative test this week. While the Senate passed its version of the bill, Senate Bill 128, the House version, House Bill 245, may not make it through the House Finance Committee. Lawmakers from both ends of the political spectrum are raising concerns with the measure. Download Audio

When the Legislature passed the budget last week, state workers thought they were in the clear. No need for pink slips. If they hadn't passed a budget, the state would have been required to send layoff notices to all of it's employees--just like they did last year. There’s only one problem – the Legislature hasn’t officially sent the budget to Governor Bill Walker. And until that happens, state workers are still in limbo. Download Audio

Alaska lawmakers are raising alarm over a provision of a bill that would cut Permanent Fund dividends and draw on fund earnings to pay for state spending. The provision would prevent the bulk of state revenue from keeping pace with inflation. Download Audio

Permanent Fund dividends would be cut in half under a bill the Senate passed Monday. It’s part of a plan to change the basis for funding state government from a dependence on oil revenues toward Permanent Fund earnings. But the plan is controversial. Download Audio

Oil and gas companies would continue to receive tax credits under a bill that a legislative committee passed Monday. But they may not be able to count on receiving much this year. That's because the next round of credits depends on funding that one key lawmaker is already calling on Governor Bill Walker to veto. Download Audio

The Senate voted 15 to 2 Friday to pass a bill to lower health insurance premium increases for individuals and families. Download Audio