Jennifer Pemberton, Alaska's Energy Desk - Juneau

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In Kaktovik, sea ice loss means a boom in polar bear tourism

That’s when outsiders started showing up in Kaktovik: tourists, who wanted to see polar bears before they went extinct.

The Visitors | The Big Thaw: Ep. 4

As polar bears lose their habitat in the Arctic, they have no choice but to come to shore and try to live part of their lives on land.

Winter rain is compromising baby muskoxen in western Alaska

A new paper shows how warmer ocean temperatures are impacting animals on land in addition to those that depend on sea ice. Listen now

Scientists propose plan to help refreeze melting Arctic

The Arctic could see its first ice-free summer as soon as 2030 as the region continues to warm faster than the rest of the planet. Some scientists think we’ve reached a point of no return, where no amount of reducing carbon emissions will save the Arctic, and a small group of scientists think it’s time for an intervention to help Mother Nature out. Listen now

Seeing the value of the forest in the trees: Chugach enters California’s carbon market

Instead of harvesting their forests for timber, the Chugach Alaska Corporation is selling an innovative new forest product: the carbon stored in the trees. Listen now

The lure of John McPhee’s “Coming into the Country,” 40 years later

“Coming into the Country,” John McPhee’s book about Alaska, was published in 1977, introducing readers across the country to a wild place, less than 20 years into its statehood. The book quickly became a best-seller and is still popular with tourists and Alaska residents alike. Listen now

49 Voices: John Borg of Eagle

This week on 49 Voices, we're doing something a little different. John Borg was the mayor and postmaster of Eagle, Alaska, in 1976 when author John McPhee came through to research for his best-selling book Coming into the Country. For 40 years now, readers come into Eagle every summer asking about the characters they met in the book. John Borg shared his thoughts with Alaska’s Energy Desk about what it’s like to host these literary tourists. Listen now