Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media

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Liz Ruskin covers Alaska issues in Washington as the network's D.C. correspondent. She was born in Anchorage and is a West High grad. She has degrees from the University of Washington and the University of Missouri School of Journalism in Columbia. She previously worked at the Homer News, the Anchorage Daily News and the Washington bureau of McClatchy Newspapers. She also freelanced for several years from the U.K. and Japan, in print and radio. Liz has been APRN’s Washington, D.C. correspondent since October 2013. She welcomes your news tips at lruskin (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  | About Liz

ANWR fight not over for Democrats in Congress

Democrats in Washington, D.C. are still hoping to block drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The latest attempt surfaced at a U.S. House committee meeting.

New icebreaker won’t have much time for the Arctic, says Coast Guard boss

The Coast Guard expects to launch the first of three new icebreakers in 2024, but don't expect to see much of it in Alaska.

From Texas to Colorado to Scotland, ANWR drilling opponents take their case to CEOs

A small crowd marched on BP's American headquarters in Denver today, demanding the oil conglomerate not drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It's part of a larger effort by environmental groups to target oil companies and also banks.

Murkowski sticks with GOP to confirm anti-abortion nominee to bench

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski helped the Senate confirm President Trump’s 65th federal trial court judge. The nominee, Wendy Vitter, overcame substantial criticism from abortion rights groups.

US House bill clears path for Alaska tribes to put land in trust

The U.S. House on Wednesday passed a bill that would clear a legal cloud over whether Alaska tribes can put land in trust, giving them the authority to govern over that land.

As the ice goes, Arctic nations find their bonds are tested

In the end, the eight nations of the Arctic Council signed a short statement, affirming their commitment to peace and cooperation. But two major issues loomed over the Arctic Council meeting in Finland this week, and they pull at the seams of Arctic unity.

Why is the US so far behind in the Arctic? Clues emerge at congressional hearing

Retired admiral Thad Allen, a former Coast Guard commandant, said the country needs to wake up to the strategic importance of the Arctic Ocean and commit more resources to it.

As memories of the Exxon Valdez fade, a plea to Congress to retain the lessons learned

A group of Alaskans traveled to Washington, D.C. to ask lawmakers to renew a fund that allows the government to launch a spill response and pay compensation, even before the company at fault is held to account.

Pompeo to Arctic Council: Easy days are over

The countries of the Arctic Council have for years rejoiced that their region is a zone of peace and cooperation. But in a speech in Finland Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo took a harder edge.

Navy plans to be more active in the Arctic

As part of an increased presence in the Arctic, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer said he'd like to send a ship through the Northwest Passage this summer.

Democrats on US House committee move anti-drilling ANWR bill

A bill to close the Arctic Refuge to oil drilling cleared the House Resources Committee Wednesday. The bill is unlikely to become law, but the session offered Congress members a chance to argue their case, and some did so loudly.

Mine opponents ask SEC to investigate Pebble’s parent company

Two groups allege Northern Dynasty Minerals has described a massive deposit to potential investors while Pebble's permit application describes a mine barely a tenth that size.
Marijuana for sale at a dispensary in California. (Photo: Dank Depot via Flickr Creative Commons)

Pot could leave black mark on immigration cases

Federal immigration authorities issued a “policy alert” about cannabis. It's causing a stir among Alaska immigration attorneys and exposes a gulf between federal policy and Alaska values on what constitutes “good moral character.” 

Interior delays offshore drilling plan, citing judge’s decision

The Trump administration's plan to expand offshore drilling in the Arctic and throughout U.S. coastal waters is on indefinite hold.

Alaskans greet Mueller report with shrugs, nods and dismay

We went to a Fred Meyer parking lot in Midtown Anchorage to ask Alaskans what they think of the Mueller report.

Glennallen man selected to lead Denali Commission

The U.S. secretary of Commerce has appointed Jason Hoke of Glennallen to be the commission’s federal co-chair.

Final Pebble hearing draws mix of views

A sizable minority of speakers - maybe one in three - argued in favor of the mine, saying the state needs the jobs. Others, like Emily Taylor, said the mine threatens the salmon runs of Bristol Bay.

AG Barr to visit rural Alaska

"Alaska Native women ... face unacceptably high levels of violence in very remote areas and I’ve actually scheduled a trip up to Alaska specifically to visit some of these communities,” U.S. Attorney General William Barr said at a Senate hearing.

Rep. Young shoves reporter on way to VAWA vote

Congressman Don Young has apologized for shoving a female reporter at the U.S. Capitol today. He was on his way to vote for the Violence Against Women Act.

VAWA bill would create limited ‘Indian Country’ for 5 Alaska tribes

The Violence Against Women Act renewal bill would allow up to five Alaska tribes territorial jurisdiction in their villages to prosecute domestic abuse and other crimes, whether the accused is a tribal member or not.