Lori Townsend, Alaska Public Media

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Lori Townsend is the News Director for the Alaska Public Radio Network. She got her start in broadcasting at the age of 11 as the park announcer of the fast pitch baseball games in Deer Park, Wisconsin. She has worked in print and broadcast journalism for more than 24 years. She was the co-founder and former Editor of Northern Aspects, a magazine featuring northern Wisconsin writers and artists. She worked for 7 years at tribal station WOJB on the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibway Reservation in Wisconsin, first as an on-air programmer and special projects producer and eventually News Director. In 1997 she co-hosted a continuing Saturday afternoon public affairs talk program on station KSTP in St. Paul, Minnesota. Radio brought her to Alaska where she worked as a broadcast trainer for Native fellowship students at Koahnic Broadcasting. Following her work there, she helped co-found the non-profit broadcast company Native Voice Communications. NVC created the award-winning Independent Native News as well as producing many other documentaries and productions. Townsend was NVC’s technical trainer and assistant producer of INN. Through her freelance work, she has produced news and feature stories nationally and internationally for Independent Native News, National Native News, NPR , Pacifica, Monitor Radio, Radio Netherlands and AIROS. Her print work and interviews have been published in News from Indian Country, Yakama Nation Review and other publications. Ms. Townsend has also worked as a broadcast trainer for the Native American Journalist’s Association and with NPR’s Doug Mitchell and as a freelance editor. Townsend is the recipient of numerous awards for her work from the Alaska Press Club, the Native American Journalists Association and a gold and a silver reel award from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. Townsend was the recipient of a Fellowship at the Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting in Rhode Island as well as a fellowship at the Knight Digital Media Center in Berkeley. She is an avid reader, a rabid gardener and counts water skiing, training horses, diving and a welding certification among her past and current interests. ltownsend (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  |  907.550.8452 | About Lori

A new book by Anchorage author David Brown, chronicles an eight-year friendship with Dizzy Gillespie, united people around music and through his spiritual beliefs. Listen now

A recent memoir chronicles the adventures of a young man as he emigrated from Ireland to New York and Alaska. Listen now

Walker administration officials say the future is bright for resource development with new oil discoveries on the North Slope, potential mining opportunities and the prospect of opening ANWR. They also say the long awaited gas line deal is coming together. How much of this message is an economic wish list and how much is reality? Listen Here

The author Tom Clancy died in 2013, but Tom Clancy the fiction series powerhouse is very much alive and well. The continuation of Clancy's thrillers are now in the capable hands of an Alaskan author-Eagle River resident Marc Cameron, a best selling author in his own right, Cameron has just released his first Clancy book -- Power and Empire features Clancy characters President Jack Ryan and his son, Jack Ryan Jr., who works for a secret intelligence agency.
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A forum discussing the value of education in a democracy takes place at the University of Alaska Anchorage campus Tuesday evening. The panel features former Alaska Supreme Court justices, doctors, education and immigration experts and others. Listen now

During the Vietnam war, the use of a defoliate known as agent orange was supposed to affect vegetation not soldiers, but it made them sick and serious health conditions resulted in a long fight for recognition and compensation. Gulf War vets also had to fight the military over health problems linked to military toxins. What's changed since these illnesses came to light? Listen Here

Today's program features a discussion with mariner, surfer and author, Jonathan White about his book Tides-The Science and Spirit of the Ocean. White spent ten years researching tides and the global effects of tidal action after his boat nearly sank in Alaska. Listen now

A nominee for a top position at the EPA is drawing both praise and criticism, including concerns from a non profit in Anchorage that works to raise awareness about the health affects of hazardous chemicals. Listen now

For too long Alaska has been near or at the top in the nation for violence against women and sexual assault. Recent harassment and rape allegations against powerful people in Hollywood and in media have elevated the problem. But will that attention help change behavior? Listen Here

Alaska's economy has been driven by resource extraction from the land and water for decades. What will and should that look like in the future? What's the outlook for oil, mining, fisheries and renewable energy such as hydro and geothermal? Listen Here

The open enrollment period for the individual health insurance market opened today. Listen now

For many Americans, the PBS documentary on the Vietnam war brings up memories of past divisions between those who supported sending U.S. military and those who did not. It was an emotional topic for families and as the number of war casualties grew, so did the protests across the country. Listen Here

It's not a number to celebrate, but the consistently high rates of domestic violence and sexual assault in Alaska need discussion and attention. Why does Alaska stay at or near the top in the nation for these terrible statistics? What's being done to combat family violence, and how can everyone help address it? Listen Here

A former Alaska resident who now lives in northern California is waiting to learn if his home will survive the wild fires. Clark Mishler, a professional photographer lived and worked in Anchorage for more than 40 years. Listen now

There's been a lot of bad news in recent weeks. Devastating hurricanes, tension with North Korea and a horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas. We face risks each day. How should we manage the stress that accompanies them without becoming overwhelmed and how should we talk to children about it all? Listen Here

A new documentary film looks at how climate change is affecting Arctic ecosystems. Listen now

Eric Rush teaches 3rd grade at Ticasuk Brown elementary in North Pole and has been a teacher for nine years. Rush said even in 3rd grade, technology can be a challenging distraction, but also a terrific tool for creating interest and excitement for learning. Listen now

Karen Martin teaches 4th grade at Denali borough's Tri Valley School. Martin has been a teacher for 12 years and was a scientist before she became a teacher. She says educational requirements for younger students have become more strenuous. Listen now

Skagway high school English and History teacher Kent Fielding taught at Mt. Edgecumbe before Skagway, where he has taught for the past 12 years. He said technology, especially phones can be a challenge in school but he says in Skagway, it's crucial. Listen now

Anchorage teacher Ben Walker teaches 7th grade science at Romig Middle School. Walker said teachers have very different challenges today then in past decades. Listen now