Lori Townsend, Alaska Public Media

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Lori Townsend is the News Director for the Alaska Public Radio Network. She got her start in broadcasting at the age of 11 as the park announcer of the fast pitch baseball games in Deer Park, Wisconsin. She has worked in print and broadcast journalism for more than 24 years. She was the co-founder and former Editor of Northern Aspects, a magazine featuring northern Wisconsin writers and artists. She worked for 7 years at tribal station WOJB on the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibway Reservation in Wisconsin, first as an on-air programmer and special projects producer and eventually News Director. In 1997 she co-hosted a continuing Saturday afternoon public affairs talk program on station KSTP in St. Paul, Minnesota. Radio brought her to Alaska where she worked as a broadcast trainer for Native fellowship students at Koahnic Broadcasting. Following her work there, she helped co-found the non-profit broadcast company Native Voice Communications. NVC created the award-winning Independent Native News as well as producing many other documentaries and productions. Townsend was NVC’s technical trainer and assistant producer of INN. Through her freelance work, she has produced news and feature stories nationally and internationally for Independent Native News, National Native News, NPR , Pacifica, Monitor Radio, Radio Netherlands and AIROS. Her print work and interviews have been published in News from Indian Country, Yakama Nation Review and other publications. Ms. Townsend has also worked as a broadcast trainer for the Native American Journalist’s Association and with NPR’s Doug Mitchell and as a freelance editor. Townsend is the recipient of numerous awards for her work from the Alaska Press Club, the Native American Journalists Association and a gold and a silver reel award from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. Townsend was the recipient of a Fellowship at the Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting in Rhode Island as well as a fellowship at the Knight Digital Media Center in Berkeley. She is an avid reader, a rabid gardener and counts water skiing, training horses, diving and a welding certification among her past and current interests. ltownsend (at) alaskapublic (dot) org  |  907.550.8452 | About Lori

The Governor’s budget proposal

Governor Mike Dunleavy says he wants a permanent fiscal plan for Alaska and he has proposed amendments to the constitution to keep future governors and lawmakers from changing the tax structure or the PFD formula without a vote of the people.

Lawmakers and the budget

The Dunleavy administration's budget plan has attracted a lot of attention and controversy. Now lawmakers are grappling with their role in addressing the flood of demands from their constituents while determining what state services are important and how it will all be paid for.

The race to Nome

One thousand miles is a long journey under the best conditions, but behind a dog team, through the wilderness in extreme weather is a daunting challenge. That's the essence of the Iditarod, bringing together tough human and animal athletes for the yearly race to Nome.

The Governor’s budget proposal

Governor Mike Dunleavy's budget proposal would cut more than one and a half billion dollars from state spending in one fiscal year.

Black business owners: the past and the future

Running a business that aims to serve a particular demographic can be a challenge. But sometimes it's borne of necessity.

The future of ANWR

Opening the 10-02 area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge or ANWR has been a dream of Alaska's congressional delegation and the oil industry for decades, but for Gwitch'in people and environmentalists, the idea is a nightmare.

Exploring the past and future of life in Alaska for Black residents

A lot of that diversity starts with the first people of the state but many people from other ethnicities came to Alaska for military or government service, to work in the oil industry, fisheries or for adventure. Black Alaskans fill roles in all these areas plus more.

The future of the Arctic

The arctic is changing and what that means for future development, travel, infrastructure and safety is on the minds of not only those who live there, but scientists, policy makers and business leaders.

The road back to accreditation

An ambitious plan to recruit and train more Alaskans for teaching positions hit a snag recently when UAA's teacher education program lost its national accreditation.

The 4th Federal Climate Assessment Report

The recently released National Climate Assessment is the fourth federal report examining the rate of change and the forecast for the future. Alaska has it’s own chapter in the massive document. The state is warming faster than any other. So what’s next? Working to understand the cultural, economic and health expense of mitigation and adaptation.

Earthquake recovery in Alaska’s largest city

Aftershocks from the massive earthquake that struck Anchorage and Southcentral Alaska on Friday morning continued over the weekend, adding stress to the assessment and recovery effort now underway. A lot of that damage was to major transportation corridors. How long will recovery take, especially in winter conditions?

Alaska’s oil production prospects

Is the North Slope seeing a resurgence in oil production? Look at the possible oil industry renaissance is our discussion on the next Talk of Alaska.

Sullivan discusses 2019 congressional priorities

Congress will have a new look in January. What does it mean for Alaska priorities and the work we need from our congressional delegation?

Criminal records redaction recommendations

Having a criminal record can hamper efforts to find a job, get a loan or even a place to live. The Alaska Criminal Justice Commission has new recommendations to redact or hide from public view, some past convictions. Will it help those who are working to improve their lives after completing their sentences? What about the public's right to know?

The Economic forecast for recession relief

Alaska has been in recession for more than three years. Our unemployment rate is currently the highest in the nation. Will the recession continue into next year or are there signs that job loss is slowing and stability may return? Are recovery and growth are on the horizon? Listen now

The emerging science of addressing violence, health care and law enforcement

October is domestic violence awareness month, but in Alaska, the consistently high rate of violence and sexual assault presents a year round need for education and assistance. What needs to change for people to have better outcomes? On the next Talk of Alaska, University of Alaska legal and medical experts discuss the evolving science and intersection between law enforcement, victim services and health care. Listen now

APU’s Elders in Residence

Alaska Pacific University or APU in Anchorage is working towards becoming a tribal university, so what does that mean? On the next Talk of Alaska, artists Joe and Martha Senungetuk will discuss their work as APU's elders in residence. They're teaching art and culture and bringing in other Native artists for classes.

How Alaska Eats

Alaskans take DIY food to the extreme. They fill freezers with wild game, fish and berries that they harvest themselves then transform the raw ingredients into hearty meals like Salmon Pot Pie and moose meatballs. Food blogger and Anchorage Daily News Editor Julia O'Malley is testing classic Alaska recipes for a new project called How Alaska Eats. Listen now

U.S. House candidate Alyse Galvin

The race for Alaska's sole seat in the U.S. House has an independent candidate fighting to unseat the long term incumbent. Alyse Galvin is running for office for the first time. She says she wants to go to congress to fight for healthcare reform, education funding and combat climate change. What's her plan to get all that done? Listen now

Ballot Measure One

Ballot measure one is a hotly contested initiative that has divided Alaskans over what may sound like a simple request-stand for salmon. But it's a complex question that's pitting environmental groups against mining and oil companies. So what does a yes or no vote mean? Both sides claim that if they lose, the results could be disastrous, but what's really at stake? Listen now