Matt Miller, KTOO - Juneau

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Matt Miller is a reporter at KTOO in Juneau.

What happened on Vanderbilt Reef in October 1918? And why was the sinking of the S.S. Princess Sophia quickly forgotten in Alaska and Canada? Listen now

An unidentified 69-year-old male passenger of Westerdam disappeared July 13 while the vessel was in Glacier Bay. Listen now

The family of Tony Rosales wept in the front row of the gallery after the jury found Mark DeSimone guilty of first-degree murder. Listen now

Most of the defendants — including the operator of Moore Charters in Auke Bay — have pleaded guilty or no contest to the charges and must pay fines and restitution. Listen now

Juneau Hidden History group shown searching for the lost Rocker Mine near Juneau. Listen now

Alaska State Troopers say ropes used by Ryan Johnson and Marc-Andre Leclerc were spotted in a cravasse on the north face of the Mendenhall Towers. Listen now

A hydrologist’s marker dye is unlikely, but there are a variety of biological processes that could be responsible for discoloration of the pond that’s located about 4 miles down the Herbert Glacier trail. Listen now

Juneau District Court Judge Thomas Nave and Juneau Superior Court Judge Louis Menendez are both retiring on June 29. Listen now

So far, Juneau Police Department officials say they haven’t found any unprocessed sexual assault kits that should’ve been sent off to the state crime laboratory in Anchorage. Listen now

In this spooky pre-Halloween edition of AK, we revisit the scene of the crime, the site of a cold-blooded murder over a hundred years ago in Juneau. KTOO’s Matt Miller spent this summer researching what happened when the Birdman of Alcatraz killed for the first time. Listen now

This year’s Juneau Icefield Research Program included a focus on art and science communication, in addition to the usual studies of the ice, ecology, and weather and climate of the icefield. Listen now

Researchers say they’ve found a new species of flying squirrel, and a Juneau biologist’s data from almost two decades ago played a key role in the discovery.

When a fire breaks out, it’s not always obvious how it started. Not only could the entire structure be wiped out, but items that started the fire could be partially destroyed or altered beyond recognition. That’s the job of the fire investigator: interview witnesses and find clues at the scene that would help them determine how the fire started. Listen now

The latest research shows that diminishing Arctic sea ice caused by climate change is forcing some species to travel further to find food or look for alternative food sources. Listen now

Alaska seismologists say continuing budget cuts are affecting their ability to quickly detect and pinpoint earthquakes. Listen now

The Arctic Council returns to Alaska with meetings in Juneau next week (March 7-10) and in Fairbanks in May. Representatives from eight Arctic countries and six indigenous groups work on shaping Arctic policy. To understand the work of the Arctic Council first-hand, a group of university students met in Fairbanks last spring to form a model council with real-world impacts. Listen now

After four years, convicted murderer Newton Lambert of Juneau may finally get an answer about whether he will get a DNA test in his case. Listen now

Scientists this year started sampling the snow and ice above Southeast Alaska’s glaciers for the particles left from over from forest fires, diesel engines and industrial activity. The particles of black carbon can accelerate warming of glaciers and the atmosphere. The big question is: where does this carbon come from? Listen Now

2016 was not a good year for the Arctic with the continued warming of the air and sea water, and diminishing sea ice. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Tuesday released its Arctic Report Card for 2016. Listen Now

There are 33 judges on this year’s election ballot. Yet probably none of them are producing radio and television ads, putting fliers in the mail, or taking out ads in the newspaper promoting their credentials as a judge and asking to remain on the bench. And, for sure, Alaska judges never accept large campaign contributions from lawyers, lobbyists, and special interest groups. Listen Now