Zoë Sobel, Alaska's Energy Desk - Unalaska

Zoë Sobel, Alaska's Energy Desk - Unalaska
88 POSTS 0 COMMENTS
Zoe Sobel is a reporter with Alaska's Energy Desk based in Unalaska. As a high schooler in Portland, Maine, Zoë Sobel got her first taste of public radio at NPR’s easternmost station. From there, she moved to Boston where she studied at Wellesley College and worked at WBUR, covering sports for Only A Game and the trial of convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

With the Trump administration, King Cove is looking into new options to make their dream of a road to Cold Bay a reality. But environmental groups argue the road would harm wildlife in the Izembek Refuge and any plan should require public input and Congressional approval. Listen now

For the second year in a row, crab fisheries in southwest Alaska are facing steep cuts. This year’s Bristol Bay red king crab fishery is 22 percent smaller than last year. Listen now

In Unalaska, unwanted fishing nets are everywhere. Now, for the first time, a company halfway around the world is recycling the nets. Listen now

After a disastrous fishing season as a processor in Bristol Bay -- the F/V Akutan's owner went broke, the crew went unpaid and now the ship is disabled and unable to move. Listen now

GCI is looking into what it would take to bring faster internet to Unalaska. The telecommunications company is evaluating if fiber would be a financially feasible solution. Right now, they are in the exploratory process. Listen now

Unalaska may be America's most productive fishing port, but you can't buy fresh fish in town.

Unalaska has experienced three entangled whales in the last two years. There used to be only one person on the island who could respond to the incidents. But thanks to a recent training, a new response team is in place. Listen now

While Unalaska’s biggest subsistence salmon run got off to a slow start this season, it’s now at a sustainable level. Listen now

Before Bogoslof volcano started erupting, it was a haven for endangered Steller sea lions, fur seals and sea birds. But scientists did not know when and if animals would return to the eastern Aleutian Island. Listen now

The trans-Alaska pipeline was the largest privately-funded construction project in the world, built across the biggest U.S. state and faced with unprecedented natural obstacles. It came with an $8 billion price tag, but true costs and benefits of the pipeline are still being calculated.

You could argue — and a lot of people do — that Alaska would be a completely different place if it weren’t for a man named Tom Marshall.

There aren't many volcanoes like Bogoslof. But with an improved monitoring network, scientists are relishing every last eruption. Listen now

On Wednesday, Federal officials apologized for their role in the World War II internment of the Unangan people. Listen now

This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Aleut evacuation. More than 800 Unangan people were removed from the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands and relocated to Southeast Alaska during World War II. Two elders share their memories.

New research could help wildlife managers better protect declining Steller sea lion populations. The study looks at why sea lions zero in on specific hunting hotspots. Listen now

The massive murre die-off that left tens of thousands of dead birds on Alaska’s coast in 2015 and 2016 may be over, but the population is still struggling. In the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, surviving murres are failing to reproduce. Listen now

There’s a new tool to help scientists and others interested in monitoring how Bering Sea fisheries respond to a changing climate. Listen now

The novelty of seeing a jumbo squid in Unalaska is not wearing off: a second one washed ashore Monday night. Listen now

A seafood processing plant in Unalaska is on the hook for $3.2 million for breaking air pollution regulations. Listen now

For most people, the last day on the job before retiring is a celebration. But Michael Cox capped off his career at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with a scathing letter to agency head Scott Pruitt. Listen now