Lower Yukon School District partners with Anchorage to bring rural students to CTE classes

The Lower Yukon School District doesn't have many courses to help students prepare for hands-on technical careers. A new partnership with the Anchorage School District hopes to change that.

AK: What happens when a community gets running water? People get healthier

What’s it like to go from hauling all your water and sewer to one day being able to turn on the faucet and flush a toilet? In Eek, a multi-year project is wrapping up bringing running water to the community for the first time.

Lawmakers, open meeting advocates criticize conditions for attending Dunleavy meetings

Dunleavy’s office described the events as discussions of the governor’s budget plan and amendment proposals. The next day, Americans for Prosperity Alaska posted online that it was hosting the events, along with terms and conditions for attendees.

Anchorage efforts to reduce homelessness see success, challenges

Anchorage Assembly member Felix Rivera, chairman of the Assembly's Committee on Homelessness, says funding is one of its top concerns

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, March 21, 2019

Dunleavy keeps open court seat, questions nomination process; Lawmakers, open meeting advocates criticize conditions on attending Gov. Dunleavy meetings; Dunleavy appointee to lead state environmental agency hits back at critics; China, Russia find common cause in Arctic; Foretold Disaster – the Exxon Valdez oil spill; Anchorage efforts to reduce homelessness see success, challenges; Wild dogs take down muskox near Toksook Bay; Racist graffiti targets Homer restaurant owners; Eagles fly free as Alaska Raptor Center rings in spring

China, Russia find common cause in Arctic

China and Russia are teaming up to pursue their interests in the Arctic, and regional security expert Rebecca Pincus says the United States needs to pay more attention. “We need to play a shaping role in this region. It’s our backyard," she said.

Dunleavy appointee to lead state environmental agency hits back at critics

Jason Brune's appointment is controversial because he worked as the public affairs and government relations manager for mining company Anglo American when it backed the proposed Pebble Mine.

Three decades after Exxon Valdez oil disaster, Prince William watchdog group remains on alert

On March 24th, 1989, 11 million gallons of crude oil spilled into Prince William Sound when the Exxon Valdez tanker ran aground. Three decades later, the Prince William Sound Regional Citizen's Advisory Council has an important role in making sure a disaster of that magnitude doesn't happen again.

With 20 ships scheduled, Unalaska expects record-setting cruise season

While tourism demand is growing in Unalaska, Carlin Enlow of the Unalaska Visitors Bureau doesn’t see the small fishing community becoming a major cruise ship destination like Ketchikan or Juneau.

Ferry supporters rally as DOT ponies up $250,000 for privatization study

This comes as the Dunleavy administration decided to offer more time — and a lot more money — for a new study to recommend ways to reduce or eliminate the state’s subsidy for the Alaska Marine Highway System.

The Governor’s budget proposal

Governor Mike Dunleavy says he wants a permanent fiscal plan for Alaska and he has proposed amendments to the constitution to keep future governors and lawmakers from changing the tax structure or the PFD formula without a vote of the people.

Medicaid cuts, while aimed at access, still raise concerns

As Gov. Mike Dunleavy seeks to close a $1.6 billion budget gap, the administration looked to Medicaid, where it could cut a lot of costs: $249 million.

Judge says BLM must reassess climate impacts of oil leases

The ruling stems from a challenge to lease sales in Wyoming, but if it stands, it could complicate the Trump administration’s effort to produce more petroleum from public lands. Opponents of ANWR drilling say the BLM's analysis of the climate impact of leasing there is inadequate, too.

As Trump administration contemplates drilling in Arctic waters, North Slope organizations stress need to protect subsistence resources

In public comments made available on a federal site, most North Slope institutions didn’t express outright opposition to the plan. But they did voice concern for subsistence resources and hunters’ continued access to them.

Owner of B.C. gold mine near Taku River courts investors

A Canadian mining company wants to reopen a long-shuttered mine about 40 miles east of Juneau. It’s just a few miles from the Alaska border, and conservationists question the Dunleavy administration’s commitment to engaging British Columbia over potential pollution from mines upstream from Alaska waters

Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Medicaid cuts, while aimed at access, still raise concerns; Hundreds protest in Juneau over Dunleavy's proposed ferry system cuts; Most Alaska military projects spared from border wall fund diversion, DOD says; Federal ruling could hurt Trump ANWR ambitions; As Trump administration contemplates Arctic drilling, North Slope organizations stress need to protect subsistence resources; Three decades after Exxon Valdez oil disaster, Prince William watchdog group remains on alert; After some ups and downs, U.S. halibut market favorable for Alaska fishermen in 2019; Anchorage airport anticipates more passengers this summer; With 20 ships scheduled, Unalaska expects record-setting cruise season

Skagway mayoral election too close to call

The results of Tuesday’s special mayoral election in Skagway are too close to call.

Most Alaska military projects spared from border wall fund diversion, DOD says

Funding for Alaska military projects is largely spared from diversion for construction of a southern border wall, under criteria released by the Department of Defense.

Bethel gives hero’s welcome to Iditarod champion Pete Kaiser

Bethel welcomed home its own Iditarod champion in grand fashion Monday night. Musher Pete Kaiser returned to Bethel on the evening jet after winning the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Fish and Game seeks to understand genetic differences between pink salmon populations

A study by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game looking at chum and pink salmon runs in Southeast and Prince William Sound is expanding to help biologists understand the interplay between wild runs and hatchery strays.