Pete Kaiser fans in Bethel celebrate hometown musher’s victory

If you heard a roar early Wednesday morning, it likely came from Pete Kaiser fans cheering across Alaska.

Iditapod: Kaiser Racing team hangs on for first Iditarod win

That’s right: Iditarod has a new champion. And it’s really looking like we’re going to have three women in the top 10 for the first time in 47 years for the Last Great Race. As for the pride and swelling hearts of Bethel, the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, maybe all of Western Alaska, Peter Kaiser and eight dogs crossed under the Burled Arch in Nome at 3:39 a.m. Alaska time Wednesday trailed only 12 minutes later by the 2018 champ, Joar Leifseth Ulsom.

Breaking: Bethel’s Pete Kaiser wins 2019 Iditarod

A new Iditarod champion has been crowned. Bethel musher Pete Kaiser’s team of 8 dogs crossed under the Burled Arch in Nome at 3:39 a.m. Wednesday, March 13, 2019. A boisterous crowd of friends and family from the Bethel area traveled to Nome to celebrate Kaiser’s victory. The 31-year-old wins $50,000 and a new truck. It’s a career highlight for Kaiser, who has raced the iditarod each year since 2010. On three separate occasions he’s placed as high as 5th, but this is his first win. His run took 9 days 12 hours and 39 minutes.

Iditapod: Kaiser poised for first Iditarod win

Heading into a final, mandatory, eight-hour rest in White Mountain about 40 minutes in the lead, Bethel's Peter Kaiser could be set up to win his first Iditarod in his team's 10th race. But anything can happen in that final 77 miles, and the defending champ, Joar Leifseth Ulsom, is not far behind. We also talk to some former champs about how they're in the middle of the pack and running a totally different kind of race. Plus: There's no sea ice! But there is Snack Attack with Ben and Zach!

Kaiser first into White Mountain with Ulsom hot on his heels

At the front of the 2019 Iditarod, Bethel musher Pete Kaiser and his dog team arrived in White Mountain this morning. Kaiser must continue to hold off the defending champion -- Joar Leifseth Ulsom -- to secure his first Iditarod victory.

Iditapod: Heartbreak for Petit as team quits on the coast

The team of Girdwood musher Nicolas Petit stalled on the edge of Norton Bay, allowing Bethel's Pete Kaiser to race past, as well as several others. Petit had been leading for most of the race, and Monday afternoon, it was still uncertain if he'd even finish. We hear from Petit, and we hear from Kaiser who now might be set up to win his first Iditarod. That, plus explanations of Mushergrams, Teacher on the Trail and... whatever happened to Pilot Rob?

Breaking: Team Petit stalls in Iditarod, Kaiser seizes lead

Monday morning saw a huge lead change in the 2019 Iditarod, as the team of Girdwood musher Nicolas Petit stalled on the coast, allowing Bethel’s Pete Kaiser to move into first place. At least three others have also passed Petit.

Iditapod: Big push to the coast

Girdwood's Nicolas Petit stayed in the lead of the 2019 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Sunday after making a long 90ish-mile run from Kaltag to Unalakleet overnight. We hear from a couple Yukon-Kuskokwim-area rookies in this year's race, and a couple YK-area parents with kids in the Iditarod. Plus, a question about climate change and a conversation with Iditarod musher Kristin Knight Pace, who has a book out called "This Much Country."

Iditapod: Making it to the Yukon River

Top teams in the 2019 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race are reaching the Yukon River on Friday as the race enters its fifth day, with snow and more warm temperatures in the forecast. Girdwood's Nicolas Petit and Norwegian-by-way-of-Willow musher Joar Leifseth Ulsom have continued to leapfrog each other, with Nic winning a five-course meal in Anvik. We hear more about the different strategies as they came into focus earlier in the race and take a listener question about team positions for dogs.

Zirkle first to Iditarod checkpoint as trailing front-pack mushers come off of Takotna 24s

A little before 8 p.m. last night, Iditarod mushers started to come off their 24-hour mandatory rests.

Zirkle takes Iditarod lead out of Ophir as top teams coordinate rests

A trio of Iditarod teams declared their 24-hour rests immediately on pulling into Tokotna Tuesday night.

Iditarod mushers react to rules reducing max dog team size from 16 to 14

Iditarod mushers racing their dogs to Nome this year are doing it with a smaller team on the gangline. The race reduced the maximum team size from 16 to 14. This means quite a bit for race strategies, speeds and the trade-offs that mushers face as they travel across Alaska.

Musher Mike Williams Jr. spending this Iditarod at home with family and dogs

The Iditarod restart kicked off Sunday afternoon in Willow. A notable Western Alaska musher will be absent from the pack.

This year, about one in five Iditarod mushers is new to the race

In addition to the field’s hyper-competitive slate of five past champions, nearly one in five Iditarod mushers this year is new to the race.

Photos: Iditarod 2019

The 47th running of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race began Sunday, with 52 dog teams speeding out of Willow along for the 1,000-mile trail to Nome.

Iditapod: The first 100 miles

We check in from the trail, where mushers covered the first 100-plus miles from the Willow restart Sunday to the first checkpoints, Yentna and Skwentna, and on to Finger Lake. Alaska Public Media's Zachariah Hughes talked to mushers at Skwentna overnight, and we take a listener question on sled design. Also, today's episode features an extended interview with Ester musher Paige Drobny, an Iditarod veteran and one of a record field of female mushers.

Iditapod: Clock ticking after Willow restart

Fifty-two mushers headed out of Willow as the 2019 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race began in earnest Sunday, March 3. Iditapod host Casey Grove is joined by KNOM's Ben Matheson and Braver Mountain Mushing's Quince Mountain for discussions of the restart, early-race strategy and some of the numbers of the Iditarod, including that this year's race features the highest-ever percentage of female mushers.

Iditapod: The ceremonial start

We talk about why the Ceremonial Start in downtown Anchorage is a thing, hear what mushers are talking about this year, and visit with the Trailgaters. It's the last time anyone gets to catch their breath before the real start of the race. And maybe catch a few hotdogs, too

Iditapod: This year’s race

We talk about trail conditions, which teams look like contenders for the Top 10, our Rookie Of The Year Picks, and the best ways to follow the race. Also, a quick intro to our team on the trail.

‘Incredibly competitive’ as mushers begin 47th running of the Iditarod

The 47th running of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is underway. 52 dog teams sped out of Willow Sunday afternoon for the 1000-mile race to Nome.