Statewide News

News coverage from every corner of Alaska from the Alaska Public Radio Network.

"All energy will be consumed by operations of Egan Center," said Stephen Trimble, CEO of Arctic Solar Ventures, whose crew installed the panels on the rooftop of the Egan Center. "If there’s a day where there’s excess capacity then it would go back out into the utility grid [ML & P] as well." (Photo by Amy Mostafa, Alaska Public Media)

Anchorage mayor unveils municipality’s first, state’s largest, rooftop solar project at Egan Center

The project consists of 216 solar panels that are expected to power up to 9% of the center’s electricity needs for the year. The city next plans to install solar panels on Fire Station 10 and the Anchorage Regional Landfill building.

Forest Service chief makes quiet visit to Tongass National Forest

Sen. Lisa Murkowski recently hosted the U.S. Forest Service’s top official in a flying visit to Tongass National Forest. The delegation kept a low profile during its visit to Southeast Alaska.

For Alaskans dealing with veto-induced anxiety, a therapist offers advice

With Alaska headed toward massive cuts to its university system, social services and other state-funded programs, many Alaskans are expressing frustration, sadness and anxiety.

Alaska News Nightly: Friday, July 12, 2019

Alaska Legislature ends efforts to overturn budget vetoes; PFD fight splits Alaska GOP, leaving some aligned with Democrats; Wildfire forces evacuations in Anderson area; Sec. Acosta did right by Alaska, Murkowski and Sullivan say; Pilot dies in fourth plane crash near Ketchikan this summer; Forest Service officials keep low profile on Tongass visit; Forest Service officials keep low profile on Tongass visit; Record warm water likely gave Kuskokwim salmon heart attacks; How hospital ERs in Alaska are helping patients with opioid use disorder; For Alaskans dealing with veto-induced anxiety, a therapist offers advice

Sec. Acosta did right by Alaska, Murkowski and Sullivan say

"I've been impressed with his level of attention to the details of his job," Murkowski said Wednesday, two days before Acosta announced his resignation.
(Photo by Katie Basile, KYUK - Bethel)

Record warm water likely gave Kuskokwim salmon heart attacks

Never-before-seen temperatures in the Kuskokwim River likely sent salmon into cardiac arrest.

How hospital ERs in Alaska are helping patients with opioid use disorder

A trip to the emergency room can be a crucial window to assist people in their recovery. Now some providers are giving patients a medicine to ease the transition so they can seek additional care. Recently, a hospital in Juneau completed one year of this program with encouraging results.

NOAA closes investigation into close call between cruise ship and humpback whales

NOAA Fisheries confirmed that the agency’s Office of Law Enforcement determined Holland America Line’s Eurdoam altered course and slowed speed as it approached the humpback whales on June 24.

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, July 11, 2019

Lawmakers remain far apart, physically and politically, as clock winds down on veto overrides; Murkowski finds EPA criticism of Pebble Mine 'substantial'; Warmer waters believed to be main cause for dead pink salmon in Norton Sound; As polar bears encroach on this Alaska village, feds charge whaling captain with illegally shooting one; 'Who are the 100?' If budget vetoes stand, Anchorage shelter says it must choose who stays and who leaves; UAA students, staff respond to impending, unprecedented budget cuts; Smoke fouls Fairbanks, North Pole area; Premera Blue Cross pays states $10 million over data breach; Alaska communities debate proposed location of LNG project; University cuts could hurt state earthquake center; Artists call on Legislature to fund state arts council

UAA students, staff respond to impending, unprecedented budget cuts

The University of Alaska is preparing to absorb a 41 percent cut in state funding. At the Anchorage campus, administrators estimate they will have to lay off 700 employees and eliminate more than a third of the school's academic programs.

The future of the UA system

Governor Mike Dunleavy's vetoes cut 41 percent of the state's contribution to the University of Alaska system budget.. How will UA handle the deep cuts to programs, staff and students? And could UA could lose national accreditation?

‘Who are the 100?’ If budget vetoes stand, Anchorage shelter says it must choose who stays and who leaves

As prospects for a veto override look increasingly slim, organizations that provide aid to low-income, homeless and other needy Alaskans say they have already had to make tough choices. But if Gov. Mike Dunleavy's budget vetoes stand, they say some of the choices ahead will be even more difficult.

Warmer waters believed to be main cause for dead pink salmon in Norton Sound

Norton Sound residents have reported salmon die-offs in unusually large numbers during the last week.

Artists call on Legislature to fund state arts council

If the Legislature does not override the governor’s veto, the Alaska State Council on the Arts will lose funding on Monday, making Alaska the only state in the U.S. without an arts council.

Gov. Dunleavy vetoes funding for Alaska’s local emergency planners

A line item veto deleted $225,000 to be distributed among 21 Local Emergency Planning Committees: local officials and volunteers who plan for disasters and train others in an emergency.

Governor’s vetoes cancel state funding for library broadband program

One of Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s vetoes has canceled state funding for broadband internet in Alaska libraries. The roughly $670,000 in savings could have far-reaching consequences for Alaska’s smallest towns.

Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Alaska’s divided Legislature fails to override governor’s line-item budget vetoes; University of Alaska president: Campus closures, program elimination and layoffs on the table under Dunleavy vetoes; Anchorage leaders brace for "unprecedented" budget situation; State's largest wildfire continues to burn across Interior; Dunleavy veto erases funding for local emergency planners ; How vetoes to the university system could affect climate research in Alaska; Governor’s vetoes cancel state funding for library broadband program; Nome Inupiaq School aims for 2020 launch

Anchorage leaders brace for “unprecedented” budget situation

Officials expect a broad range of impacts affecting just about every area of residential life.
(Photo by Katie Basile, KYUK - Bethel)

Alaska heat wave hits Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta

People living in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta felt something unusual this past holiday weekend: a heat wave. Temperatures crept close to 90 degrees in many parts of the region, including Bethel, but a malfunctioning thermometer and not enough data could prevent this summer from making it into the record books.

University of Alaska president: Campus closures, program elimination and layoffs on the table under Dunleavy vetoes

The University of Alaska stands to lose $134 million in state funding if Governor Mike Dunleavy's line-item vetoes are not overturned by legislators.