Statewide News

News coverage from every corner of Alaska from the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Court rules against Klukwan, conservation groups in permitting lawsuit

On Friday, a federal court ruled that the Bureau of Land Management does not have to consider future impacts of mine development before approving activities for mineral exploration in the Chilkat Valley.

Sludge, scum and grit take toll on Sitka’s aging wastewater facility

What happens when we flush? Here’s why Sitka officials are pitching a multimillion-dollar revitalization project for the city’s nearly 40-year-old wastewater facility.

Tongass old growth timber sale gets go-ahead despite habitat concerns

The U.S. Forest Service is moving ahead with one of the largest old growth timber sales Southeast Alaska has seen in years. The project projects harvesting as much as 225 million board feet of old growth lumber.

49 Voices: Geneva Luteria of Anchorage

This we we're hearing from Geneva Luteria in Anchorage. Luteria is a student at Dimond High School whose parents moved to Alaska from the Phillipines. She was part of this year's Points of Light Leadership Institute program. 

Alaska News Nightly: Friday, March 15, 2019

House forms new tribal affairs subcommittee; House schedules dates for public budget hearings; Over 100 people rally in Anchorage as part of Global Climate Strike; Fairbanks mayors disagree on marijuana use at retail stores; Southeast will see one of the largest old growth timber sales in years; Surviving snowboarders remember fallen Haines avalanche victim; Sitka sac roe fishery on two-hour notice starting Sunday; AK: Ketchikan mental health clinic hopes 'Proof' will debunk taboos; 49 Voices: Geneva Luteria of Anchorage

AK: Ketchikan mental health clinic hopes ‘Proof’ will debunk taboos

The nonprofit that runs a Ketchikan mental health clinic recently sponsored a local production of a Broadway play. As Leila Kheiry reports, it's one of many steps in an effort to combat taboos around mental illness.

Juneau, cruise industry reach tentative agreement on passenger fees

The tentative agreement brings an end to almost three years of litigation between Cruise Lines International Association Alaska and the City and Borough of Juneau over how the city spends passenger fees.

House committee to hold budget hearings across Alaska

House Speaker Bryce Edgmon says the format will allow more Alaskans to speak face-to-face with lawmakers. But House Minority Leader Lance Pruitt opposes the idea for fiscal reasons.

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, March 14, 2019

Murkowski votes to block Trump's emergency; Sullivan votes opposite; Alaska, oil companies to determine economic viability of gasline within 60 days; Juneau, cruise industry reach tentative agreement on passenger fees; Man dies in Haines avalanche; Young asks Army surgeon general for suicide inquiry; House committee to hold budget hearings across Alaska; Juneau legislators address budget concerns at town hall; Virginia GOP group helps boost conservative Anchorage school board candidates; Aerial surveys begin as ADF&G prepares for herring fishery; Three women finish in top ten for Iditarod, for the first time; 'This Much Country' chronicles path from journalism to mushing dogs

Exxon Valdez disaster 30 year anniversary

It was the spill officials didn't think would happen. The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill released 10.8 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound. 30 years later the industry's prevention measures have changed dramatically.

Iditapod: A new trio of elite women mushers

It happened, because Paige Drobny made it happen: The top 10 of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race includes three women for the first time ever. Fans of Drobny, Aliy Zirkle and Jessie Royer are ecstatic, as are some Bethel residents who were cheering on 2019 Iditarod champion Pete Kaiser. We hear from them in this episode, plus a lightning round of questions and... a couple special guests!

Pete Kaiser fans in Bethel celebrate hometown musher’s victory

If you heard a roar early Wednesday morning, it likely came from Pete Kaiser fans cheering across Alaska.

The Alaska Roadless Rule decision is moving along. Some tribal governments say it’s moving too fast.

The Organized Village of Kake says the timeline has felt rushed for a decision that could have a major impact on rural Southeast Alaska.

Juneau legislators address budget concerns at town hall

In back-to-back town hall meetings this week, Juneau city officials and legislators addressed concerns about Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s proposed state budget. The City and Borough of Juneau has said it stands to lose more than $28 million from reductions in state funding.

Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Bill would repeal conflict of interest requirements enacted last year; Bethel's Pete Kaiser wins 2019 Iditarod; Bethel fans sing praises for hometown hero Pete Kaiser; Alaska rules for onsite marijuana use take effect in April; Alaska state ferry supporters come out in force; The Alaska Roadless Rule decision is moving along. Some tribal governments say it’s moving too fast.; Are more Juneau high school graduates ready for college? It depends.; Sparse snowfall in Eastern Interior leaves little ground insulation, may boost wildfire danger; Ahead of 2022 Olympics, APU skiers get an early preview of Beijing courses

Ahead of 2022 Olympics, APU skiers get an early preview of Beijing courses

China will be hosting the 2022 Winter Olympics for the first time. Skiers from 21 different countries got the opportunity to test the trails at a race hosted by Swix China at the start of March. Alaska Pacific University skier Forrest Mahlen was one of 13 representing the U.S. in the race.

Iditapod: Kaiser Racing team hangs on for first Iditarod win

That’s right: Iditarod has a new champion. And it’s really looking like we’re going to have three women in the top 10 for the first time in 47 years for the Last Great Race. As for the pride and swelling hearts of Bethel, the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, maybe all of Western Alaska, Peter Kaiser and eight dogs crossed under the Burled Arch in Nome at 3:39 a.m. Alaska time Wednesday trailed only 12 minutes later by the 2018 champ, Joar Leifseth Ulsom.

Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Murkowski's public lands bill becomes law; Memos detail gaps in ANWR science; Interior says they’ll guide future work; Cash-strapped state of Alaska takes aim at North Slope government's oil money; Kaiser eyes Nome from White Mountain, with a hungry Ulsom on his tail; House and Senate both look at what budget cuts to make amid Dunleavy proposal; Bill seeks to require jail time in cases similar to 2018 Justin Schneider assault; Search continues for pilot missing northwest of Anchorage; Fairbanks City Council fails to overturn mayor's veto of anti-discrimination ordinance; State plans to sell Sheldon Jackson Museum in cost-cutting efforts

Iditapod: Kaiser poised for first Iditarod win

Heading into a final, mandatory, eight-hour rest in White Mountain about 40 minutes in the lead, Bethel's Peter Kaiser could be set up to win his first Iditarod in his team's 10th race. But anything can happen in that final 77 miles, and the defending champ, Joar Leifseth Ulsom, is not far behind. We also talk to some former champs about how they're in the middle of the pack and running a totally different kind of race. Plus: There's no sea ice! But there is Snack Attack with Ben and Zach!

State plans to sell Sheldon Jackson Museum in cost-cutting efforts

The state Division of Alaska Libraries, Archives, and Museums announced late last week that it is looking to sell the Sheldon Jackson Museum.