Alaska's Energy Desk

Alaska's Energy Desk is a team of six reporters covering energy and environment in Alaska. We produce in-depth enterprise reporting for radio, video and web. The team is a collaboration between Alaska Public Media in Anchorage, KTOO in Juneau and KUCB in Unalaska and supported with a grant from CPB.

Hildebrand is known for being among the wealthiest people in the world, with a net worth of $7.6 billion, according to Bloomberg. Listen now

In an interview last month, Balash describee what he called a “really difficult management challenge” with Fish and Wildlife Service employees. He said during a recent meeting with the agency in Alaska, he felt employees weren’t eager to carry out the new law. Listen now
The Crystal Serenity is the largest passenger ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Seward to New York City. Photo: Rachel Waldholz, Alaska's Energy Desk

It's the largest cruise ship to navigate the route, which hugs the coasts of Alaska, Canada and Greenland. And it's attracted international attention, with many wondering if it’s a sign of what’s to come as the Arctic sees increasingly ice-free summers. Listen now

Donlin Gold is advancing through the permitting process for its proposed mine in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and already has two state permits in hand. Listen now

Six U.S. senators and the U.S. Secretary of Energy traveled to Bethel Monday to hold a hearing on Alaska’s energy challenges and innovations. The team included the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, lead by Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski. But before the hearing, the group went on a field trip to see where those challenges and innovations intersect.

A decades-old debate is gaining traction over the stability of Sitka’s herring population. Listen now

Members of the One People Canoe Society will travel this week from Alaska to North Dakota to paddle in protest over a controversial pipeline. Listen now

In Alaska, big fall storms are often associated with the jet stream. Listen now

The Walker Administration is asking for public input as it develops a sweeping new climate policy for the state. The public has until June 4 to weigh in online. Listen now

Duff Mitchell has a big vision for a small rectangular plot in downtown Juneau. He envisions it as the future site for a district heating facility. Listen now

Diesel is running about $2.71 per gallon in Southeast Alaska, but in places that depend on diesel for electricity, there are still households that won’t let the cost dampen the holiday spirit. Listen Now

Hilcorp snapped up more than 100,000 acres in Cook Inlet for additional oil and gas development at federal and state lease sales held Wednesday. Listen now

The $15 million in this year’s spending bill is just a fraction of what Newtok needs to fund its relocation. But village leaders say it’s crucial seed money that will make everything else possible. Listen now

As oil prices have dropped to levels that were unthinkable just a year ago, many Alaskans are wondering whether the state is facing economic calamity. The short answer is: not yet. We spoke with state labor economist Neal Fried, to ask how it's possible that at $30 dollars a barrel, Alaska is still doing pretty well. Download Audio

A watchdog citizens group is working on a series of reports on Cook Inlet’s oil and gas infrastructure, following several accidents last spring. Listen now

According to an announcement this week from the World Meteorological Organization, 2016 is on track to be the warmest year ever. If current trends continue, it would be the third straight year of record-breaking heat. Listen Now 

Alaska’s leaders are getting ready for tough negotiations over how the state will deal with its multi-billion-dollar budget hole. How much the oil and gas industry should help fill that hole will be an especially controversial question for the legislature this session. Listen Now

Parts of Interior Alaska, like Fairbanks, have been seeing record cold temperatures this winter. But in Southeast Alaska, the frigid conditions have had a direct impact on the way people power their homes. Listen now

Billy Adams, a hunter in his 50s, says that when he was growing up in Utqiagvik, there was almost always ice attached to the shore by now. Listen now

“I can recall a time where we would have maybe one good freezing rain event a winter,” said Tom Grman. “And then several winters ago, those were really prevalent.”