Alaska's Energy Desk

Alaska’s Energy Desk is a collaboration between KTOO-FM in Juneau, Alaska Public Media in Anchorage, KUCB in Unalaska, Fairbanks Daily News-Miner in Fairbanks, KBRW in Utqiaġvik and KYUK in Bethel. Each week we produce in-depth coverage of energy issues in Alaska for radio, video and web. From the state budget to personal energy use, resource development to Arctic life, we cover how energy issues impact Alaskan lives and landscapes. Alaska’s Energy Desk is a Regional Journalism Collaboration, launched in 2016 with a supporting grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Report recommends limited changes to oil tax credits

The state paid out more than half a billion dollars in refundable tax credits this past year -- and gave up another half a billion in credits deducted from companies' tax liabilities. Download Audio

New rules may help small energy projects sell to the grid

New rules could make it possible to develop more alternative energy in Alaska, by making it easier for independent projects to sell their power to the grid. Download Audio

Feds say TAPS owners can’t raise rates to pay for over-budget upgrades

A federal commission says the oil companies that own the trans-Alaska pipeline can’t raise rates to cover cost overruns for an upgrade that went horribly over-budget.

State buys out TransCanada’s interest in gas project

The state of Alaska has completed its acquisition of TransCanada Corp.'s interest in a major gas project. Gov. Bill Walker, in a release, called it an historic day.

Tesoro to buy Flint Hills assets in Anchorage, Fairbanks

Tesoro Corp. has announced that its Alaska affiliate will purchase a portion of Flint Hills Resources assets in Fairbanks and Anchorage.

With replacements and resignation, Walker consolidates control of gas line project

You don't normally associate "state gas line corporation" and "drama" - but this weekend, the state-owned Alaska Gasline Development Corporation was the source of all kinds of drama. Download Audio:

Fauske resigns as president of state gas line corporation

Dan Fauske has resigned as president of the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation. It follows other recent changes at the corporation, which is responsible for Alaska's share of the proposed $45 to $65 billion project to bring natural gas from the North Slope.

Walker replaces 2 on gas line board ahead of crucial vote

Gov. Bill Walker is once again shaking up the state's gas line team. On Friday, Walker replaced two of seven board members for the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation, or AGDC. Download Audio

AK: With sustainable logging in mind, Galena looks to forests for fuel

Large-scale logging on the Yukon River started about a hundred years ago. These days, villages like Galena are once again looking to the forest for an energy supply. But this time, a new generation of loggers is thinking more about sustainability. Listen now:

Conoco advances project in NPR-A; Independents snap up North Slope leases

ConocoPhillips announced today (Nov. 18) that it will move ahead with construction of a $900 million project in the North Slope's National Petroleum Reserve. And small independent companies collectively spent $9.5 million for the right to drill on state land on the North Slope.

Statoil will exit Alaska, following Shell

Norwegian oil company Statoil said Tuesday (Nov. 17) that it will end exploration efforts in the Chukchi Sea and close its Anchorage office. The decision comes just two months after Shell ended its quest to drill in the Arctic Ocean, citing disappointing results at its first well. Download Audio

Gas line team reshuffle puts scrutiny on high salaries

As the state prepares to take a larger role in the Alaska LNG gas line project, its leadership team is once again in flux. The changes are bringing new attention to the salaries involved -- including one negotiator who has been paid about $120,000 a month since June. Download Audio

Warming landscape triggers northward habitat shift

For years scientists have documented changes in Alaska’s vegetation due to a warmer climate. Now, researchers are noting animals establishing new habitats on the North Slope in response to the altered landscape. Download Audio

Alaska holding out against emission-cutting policies

The Arctic is on the front lines of climate change. Alaska is warming at twice the rate of the rest of the planet. A group called Alaska Common Ground hosted an all-day forum in Anchorage over the weekend to answer the question, "What are we doing about it?" Download Audio

Reporters’ roundtable: the Alaska LNG project

The Alaska LNG special session came to a close last week. It was the third special session held this year. Zachariah Hughes hosts a reporter's roundtable diving into the complex issues surround the LNG project. What decisions came out of this session? And what exactly does this mean for Alaska? Listen Now:

Arctic Council looks to Alaska citizen science network

A tribal citizen science network that got its start in Alaska is being touted as a model for tracking climate change in the Arctic. The eight-nation Arctic Council plans to expand the Local Environmental Observer Network to other Arctic nations. Download Audio

Forecast: $80 oil at decade’s end

The International Energy Agency is predicting the return of higher oil prices, but not soon enough to end the gut punch to Alaska’s budget. Download Audio

Feds take public comment on Hilcorp’s offshore Liberty project

Shell may have given up on drilling off Alaska's coast, but federal regulators are now taking public comment on another -- though very different -- offshore drilling proposal. Download Audio

Homer, state argue over gas assessments

The City of Homer wants the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities to pay a little more than $26,000 in natural gas assessments for eight state-owned plots of land. DOT refuses. The city and DOT are negotiating a solution. Download Audio

Ice locked in glaciers may substantially contribute to sea level rise

Researchers say more than half the ice locked up in glaciers could be gone by the end of the century. A new study suggests the resulting runoff could raise the earth’s oceans three inches or more. The study suggests fisheries and hydro-electric dams could also be impacted by the change. Download Audio