Fairbanks hit 90 degrees last week for the first time in four years. The heat was very localized to the Tanana and Yukon river valleys. We asked Brian Brettschneider, with our Ask a Climatologist segment, which areas of Alaska usually see the hottest temperatures in the summer. He says the warmest temperatures are almost always found in the Interior.

The U.S. Forest Service wrapped up objection hearings Wednesday on a plan that could shape the future of timber in the Tongass National Forest. Listen Now

For the first time since February, the statewide temperature index for Alaska dipped below normal earlier this week. Sunday and Monday were both slightly below normal, interrupting a 218 day stretch of above normal temperatures. Listen Now

A study released this week sheds new light how vulnerable marine mammals are to increased traffic in the Arctic.

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. Brettschneider says it’s a phenomenon called polar amplification. Listen now

Zombies are real. They’re walking around on the bottom of Alaska’s ocean, mindlessly incubating the next generation of creatures that will, in turn, create even more zombies.

A Dillingham beekeeper is working with the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, to determine what it will take to help honeybees overwinter in the Bristol Bay community.
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Alaska’s Board of Game voted to remove a requirement that animal traps have some kind of identification in Southeast Alaska and the Tok region. The Board met on statewide proposals to change hunting and trapping regulations last week in Fairbanks.

Abraham Ellis is with the Sandia National Labs in New Mexico. “We are interested in those technologies to figure out ways to improve the energy resilience for cities,” he said. “For defense applications, and things like that, that really need to keep on going with electricity supply, even if the normal grid fails for whatever reason.”

For the last century, reindeer have roamed St. Paul Island without much oversight. But now, the tribal government is stepping up its management style to boost subsistence options and the local economy.

U.S. State Department officials are in Southeast Alaska this week to talk about transboundary mines. The Environmental Protection Agency also has sent representatives. Listen now

Environmental groups and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have reached an agreement that settles one of two active lawsuits aimed at forcing the agency to take overdue action on Fairbanks-North Pole area air quality. Localized, but extreme wintertime episodes of fine particulate pollution due to wood and fossil fuel burning emissions have long plagued the communities. Clean air advocates see the legal action as a small win in a long-running effort to reduce pollution. Listen now

Rep. Don Young claims pride of authorship in the Magnuson Stevens Act, but he's penned a few revisions. The U.S. House just passed them. Critics say he shouldn't mess with a masterpiece. Listen now

Audubon Alaska recently released an atlas showing where the most valuable salmon streams and bird habitat are located in Southeast. It also identifies the biggest threats to those areas. Listen Now

The last commercial harvest of Pribilof Island blue king crab was in 1999. Extremely low population numbers have kept that fishery closed. Listen Now

Across the globe, 2017 was the second hottest year on record, just behind 2016, according to a European Union monitoring center. Temperatures in Alaska last year were a bit more moderate. 2017 was the 13th warmest year on record. Listen now

Following two minor accidents, a citizens' watchdog group is asking the state's top environmental regulator to require tougher training for new oil spill response crews in Prince William Sound. Listen now

Cooperation across the Bering Strait was recently strengthened when the U.S. and Russia signed a joint wildlife agreement. Download Audio

Two federal agencies have beefed up their guidelines for wetlands mitigation in Alaska. The announcement comes after a news outlet found only 26 percent of Alaska permittees were required to mitigate wetland damage. Listen now

Researchers say Pavlof volcano is still rumbling and exploding but is no longer sending up massive ash clouds. Download Audio