Swan Lake Fire growth prompts switch from monitoring to firefighting

A wildfire near Sterling on the Kenai Peninsula grew to about 8,400 acres as of Friday, according to the Division of Forestry.

49 Voices: Charla Kouadio and Theresa Coley-Kouadio of Kotzebue

This week we're hearing from Charla Kouadio and Theresa Coley-Kouadio in Kotzebue. The married couple have lived in Kotzebue for just over two years.

AK: Juneau beach yields gold to dedicated dredgers

In Juneau, a particular type of recreational mining has been picking up at a special beach in recent years. Mining histories identify the sand there as the century-old tailings of the Alaska-Gastineau Mining Company.

Fire danger is high in the Chugach National Forest

Fires are still permitted in the forest, but the Forest Service is asking residents to be particularly careful.

Dunleavy: Wasilla special session will be focused on PFD, capital budget can come later

Dunleavy held a press conference Friday in front of Wasilla Middle School, his recommended venue for the session. He says while there is still work to be done on the capital budget, the dividend is his priority for this session.

Border senators urge more oversight from B.C. in transboundary mining

U.S. senators from Alaska and three other border states have written to British Columbia’s premier expressing concern over transboundary mining.

‘Pretty unbelievable,’ says Kotlik hunter who helped document recent spike in seal deaths

Harold Okitkun counted 18 dead seals north of Kotlik — a number he says he’s never seen or heard of other people in the village seeing.

Murkowski differs with Trump on campaign help from foreign powers

Sen. Lisa Murkowski was not happy to hear President Trump say he would accept foreign intel on a political opponent.

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, June 13, 2019

Dunleavy calls for round two in Wasilla after Alaska Legislature adjourns first special session; Murkowski differs with Trump on campaign help from foreign powers; EPA officials hear concerns over Pebble Mine during Bristol Bay visit; Why fishermen are mailing corks to Murkowski; Corrections commissioner cancels prison's Father's Day event; Alaska's US senators express concerns over transboundary mines in BC letter; Federal review finds gaps in Alaska 'critical incident' reporting; 'Pretty unbelievable,' says Kotlik hunter who helped document recent spike in seal deaths; State attorney general praises federal ruling on road-building in Southeast; Three women removed from state human rights commission without much explanation; Partnering with FBI, Unalaska police aim to finish Ballyhoo crash investigation; Partnering with FBI, Unalaska police aim to finish Ballyhoo crash investigation; Former UAF hockey player part of Stanley Cup-winning Blues

Corrections commissioner cancels prison’s Father’s Day event

Alaska's Corrections commissioner has canceled an upcoming Father's Day event at Goose Creek Correctional Center near Wasilla a couple days before it was set to take place, due to concerns about contraband and safety, the department says.

Senior living in Alaska

Alaska’s senior population is booming. Meanwhile, the state is experiencing what experts call a housing "crisis." How are communities working to meet the growing need for senior housing and long-term care options?

Dunleavy calls for round two in Wasilla after Alaska Legislature adjourns first special session

Gov. Mike Dunleavy has called for a second special session to be hosted in Wasilla next month. The session’s agenda is limited to PFD funding.

Partnering with FBI, Unalaska police aim to finish Ballyhoo crash investigation

Two local high school students were killed when a truck plunged off the cliffside and fell about 900 feet to the shoreline below. Authorities said they hope to have an explanation by the end of June.

Why fishermen are mailing corks to Murkowski

Bristol Bay fishermen who oppose the Pebble Mine are adding an unusual task to their pre-season chores: They’re writing messages on cork floats and mailing them to Sen. Lisa Murkowski.

Vote to draw from state savings account to pay for capital projects falls short

With large differences remaining over permanent fund dividends, that means the special session will likely end Thursday or Friday with more work left to do.

State employees anxious as government shutdown threat looms

A state operating budget is now on its way to Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s desk. The question is whether it will be enough to prevent a government shutdown on July 1.

Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Vote to draw from state savings account to pay for capital projects falls short; $20M state grant released to Alaska schools, but future funding remains unclear; Work begins on new site for village of Newtok; State employees anxious as government shutdown threat looms; Numerous fires spark around Interior; DEC details new plan to address PFAS in soil; Unusually high number of seal deaths reported along the coast of the Bering and Chukchi Seas; Ask a Climatologist: Anchorage close to record number of 'thunderstorm days'; Goat yoga? In Fairbanks, there’s a new animal to flow with: reindeer

$20M state grant released to Alaska schools, but future funding remains unclear

School districts across Alaska are looking forward to a bump in their bank accounts from a $20M grant appropriated last year. But the overall outlook for state education spending is far from clear.

Unusually high number of seal deaths reported along the coast of the Bering and Chukchi Seas

“We don’t know if it’s lack of sea ice, or if there was a harmful algal bloom,” said Julie Speegle with NOAA Fisheries. “There’s quite a range of factors.”

Goat yoga? In Fairbanks, there’s a new animal to flow with: reindeer

“You’ll see the reindeer getting into these amazing poses,” said Jane Atkinson, owner of Running Reindeer Ranch. “And it’s like wow…. Look at this little yoga move that they do!”