Citing population decline, ADF&G closing hunt early for Mulchatna caribou herd

The restriction is a conservation measure following the herd’s dramatic population drop to half the size that it was three years ago.

LISTEN: How can we get more Alaskans teaching in their home communities?

The highest rates of teacher turnover in Alaska are with teachers who are trained outside the state. So how are educators and lawmakers working to get more Alaskans trained to teach in their home communities?

Wrangell sees a 50 percent increase in water consumption during cold snap

Water consumption has risen in Wrangell since the recent cold snap. The town is using 150 gallons per minute more than it did last month. That’s about a 50 percent increase in consumption.

Some Thunder Mountain Mobile Park residents frustrated after more than a week of water issues

On Jan. 12, water pressure at Juneau’s Thunder Mountain mobile home park dropped to a trickle. It took days to get fixed, and now they have to boil the water to use it. Some residents say they’re frustrated with how the situation was handled.

With a focus on wellness, Kotzebue schedules series of suicide prevention learning circles

The Alaska group Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide, or PCCARES, focuses on addressing suicide in Northern Alaska communities through community-focused listening circles.

LISTEN: Hear and share holiday greetings all across the state in our annual two-hour holiday special

Alaska is a big state, but people are very connected here. If you want to find out how connected Alaskans are, just listen to the radio for a while on Tuesday morning.

LISTEN: Alaska’s heath care workforce shortage threatens the growing industry. How are communities working to meet the demand?

Alaska's health care industry is growing, and the need for nurses and other health care professionals is on the rise. Studies warn of a looming nursing shortage. How are communities around the state working to meet the healthcare workforce demand?
Rainey Hopson 2

In Anaktuvuk Pass, a gardener brings new life to ancient foods with Arctic agriculture

Getting started wasn’t easy. Hopson spent time in Northern California when she was young, working in her grandmother’s garden. But when she applied that knowledge in the Arctic, it failed miserably...at first.

‘They carve to have a place to sleep.’ He’s made a place for struggling ivory carvers in Anchorage

A former inmate is transforming a downtown gallery and workshop into a nonprofit geared toward giving opportunities to artists with few options.

Many Alaska villages have no local police. How do we keep them safe?

The Anchorage Daily News reports 1 in 3 Alaska villages lacks adequate law enforcement. We'll discuss how to ensure the safety of all Alaskans, both on and off the road system on the next Talk of Alaska.

Renewable energy in Alaska

From hydropower to solar energy, renewable and alternative energy projects are taking root statewide. What are the challenges -- and emerging opportunities -- when it comes to developing new power sources in the Land of the Midnight Sun?

Curyung Tribe to leave BBAHC

The tribe said it decided to withdraw, in part, due to issues with patient care and the health corporation's insufficient response to their concerns. The earliest effective date for the withdrawal is May 2020.

New water tests show Bethel lead and copper levels meet federal standards

A large infrastructure project last fall is the suspected cause of elevated copper and lead levels discovered at some locations in Bethel’s City Subdivision.

Students in Mertarvik will go to school in evacuation center

This school year, some students in Newtok will leave behind most of their friends. In October, 21 families from Newtok will relocate to their new village, Mertarvik, and kids in those families will have to transfer schools.
Capt. Alyson White and Jennifer Brown exchange a laugh during a traditional dance in Newtok on July 25, 2019. Capt. White leads a rotating group of military trainees who are working on the village relocation project. (Photo by Katie Basile, KYUK - Bethel)

Newtok partners with military to escape coastal erosion

Newtok is the nation’s first community to relocate due to climate change, and the military is lending a hand. U.S. troops are working side by side with Newtok residents to build new homes.
The Ninglik River shoreline is mere feet from houses in Newtok on July 26, 2019. As Newtok residents await relocation, the infrastructure erodes as quickly as the land. (Photo by Katie Basile, KYUK - Bethel)

Newtok’s infrastructure erodes like the ground below it

The village of Newtok has been waiting over two decades to move to its new home in Mertarvik. As they’ve waited, their public health infrastructure has eroded like the ground beneath the village.
Bethel city water testing from September 2018 shows levels of copper exceeding federal standards in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Fitness Center water system. (Photo by Christine Trudeau, KYUK - Bethel)

Bethel water testing shows lead and copper levels exceeding federal standards

Bethel residents are being advised to take precautions after elevated levels of lead and copper were found in the city’s drinking water from select locations. The city is awaiting results from additional tests and discussing solutions.
Inside “Aging With Change.” (Photo by JoJo Phillips, KNOM - Nome)

Nome museum exhibit embraces Native food traditions, new and old

A new multimedia exhibit at the Carrie M. McLain Memorial Museum until October showcases traditional Native foods and the ways they are prepared throughout the Bering Strait region.
molly of denali

The work of eradicating stereotypes

All cultures need a correct reflection of who they are in media. There has been progress, such as the new PBS kids program Molly of Denali, but a lot of work remains. We'll discuss the good, the bad and the 'still needs to be changed' on the next Talk of Alaska.
The city of Hoonah on May 2, 2019 (Photo by David Purdy, KTOO - Juneau)

Can trauma be passed down through DNA? Researchers and Hoonah residents search for answers.

It’s well known that traumatic experiences can have lifelong impacts on health and well-being. But it’s possible that those effects can last longer than a single lifetime. A new study asks whether the effects of trauma have been passed down genetically in Tlingit families in Hoonah.