4th Alaska coronavirus case reported in Ketchikan; UAF says one of the Fairbanks patients is an employee

The Ketchikan Emergency Operations Center reported a positive test for COVID-19 on Tuesday. The man has a history of travel to the Lower 48, officials said.

LISTEN: How emergency officials and first responders are preparing for coronavirus

President Donald Trump declared a national emergency over the coronavirus pandemic. What does that mean for state emergency planners?

Most Alaska villages lack road access and hospitals. Here’s how they’ll fight the coronavirus.

Since most cases of COVID-19 don’t cause serious illness, officials hope that most sick people can stay at home and monitor their symptoms. But they've also developed plans to move people to regional hubs or the Anchorage tribal hospital if necessary, and to provide alternative housing if the sick person poses risks to elders.

Alaska public schools closed to students until March 30, governor says

K-12 public schools in Alaska will be closed to children until March 30.

In Bristol Bay, America’s largest salmon fishery, preparations begin for coronavirus prevention ahead of the season

Thousands of fishermen, processors, and cannery workers will travel to Bristol Bay in the coming months to participate in the commercial fishery. As of Thursday afternoon, no one in the region had been tested for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus

On high alert for coronavirus, services to Alaska elders roll on

One subset of Alaskans is particularly at risk from the coronavirus: the elderly. Alaska facilities that serve senior citizens likely have tough choices ahead.

LISTEN: Experts answer Alaskans’ questions about coronavirus

Coronavirus is spreading rapidly across the globe. While Alaska has not yet had any confirmed cases, the United States has, and health and emergency preparedness officials are getting ready to combat the virus locally.
child reading

LISTEN: Pediatric blindness is incredibly common in Alaska. Here’s how you can help your child.

Has your child had their first vision screening check? Pediatric blindness is particularly common in Alaska- one cause was discovered two decades ago and the other was just reported this month.

LISTEN: Teen vaping doesn’t start in high school. It starts in middle school.

Coverage of the growing problem of teenage vaping has, for the most part, been focused on high school students. But according to the American Journal of Public Health, about 29% of lifetime smokers are first introduced to nicotine products between age 12 and 14.

With no ferry service this winter, Cordova’s economy feels the pinch

The last mainline ferry broke down last week, leaving travelers stranded. For many communities, including Cordova, the ferry is their only link to the state’s road system beyond flights.

LISTEN: When it comes to pediatric surgery, there are more in-state options than you think

Finding out your child needs surgery can cause stress and anxiety. What if your child is born with an abnormality that requires surgery? What happens when a child gets cancer? How do you know what can be treated in Alaska and what needs to go out-of-state?
A picture of a large cardboard box and a pile vape pens in ziplock bags on a table.

LISTEN: To combat teen vaping in Alaska schools, educators and state officials work together

Teen vaping is a growing problem nationwide, with the CDC reporting that one in four students use vaping products. But what’s inside the liquid being vaporized? And how will it affect teenager’s health?

LISTEN: Fighting to add mental health education to Alaska’s high school curriculum

Legislation that aims to address the emotional health of our youth is being introduced across the country. In Alaska, HB 181 intends to introduce mental health education to the Anchorage School District curriculum.

Citing population decline, ADF&G closing hunt early for Mulchatna caribou herd

The restriction is a conservation measure following the herd’s dramatic population drop to half the size that it was three years ago.

LISTEN: There’s more to your vision than meets the eye

2020 is the year of the eye. The eyes are not just a window to your soul, they are a window to your health. Abnormalities spotted in the eye are often the first signs of disease elsewhere in the body. Do you have questions about glaucoma? Cataracts? What about PRK or Lasik?

LISTEN: How can we get more Alaskans teaching in their home communities?

The highest rates of teacher turnover in Alaska are with teachers who are trained outside the state. So how are educators and lawmakers working to get more Alaskans trained to teach in their home communities?

Wrangell sees a 50 percent increase in water consumption during cold snap

Water consumption has risen in Wrangell since the recent cold snap. The town is using 150 gallons per minute more than it did last month. That’s about a 50 percent increase in consumption.

Some Thunder Mountain Mobile Park residents frustrated after more than a week of water issues

On Jan. 12, water pressure at Juneau’s Thunder Mountain mobile home park dropped to a trickle. It took days to get fixed, and now they have to boil the water to use it. Some residents say they’re frustrated with how the situation was handled.

With a focus on wellness, Kotzebue schedules series of suicide prevention learning circles

The Alaska group Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide, or PCCARES, focuses on addressing suicide in Northern Alaska communities through community-focused listening circles.