AK: One family’s pirate home is Sitka’s hidden treasure

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What if you wanted your home to be more extraordinary, more unusual, more like, say, a pirate ship? One Sitka family has been realizing that vision, slowly turning their home into a shipwrecked, tropical paradise over the last 40 years.
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AK: Escape the room and save Talkeetna

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Under most circumstances, being trapped in a small room with a countdown clock would be a bit nerve-wracking, but a new business in Talkeetna aims to make it fun. Trapped in Talkeetna is a live escape room experience, where a team of players has one hour to solve a puzzle in order to escape. KTNA’s Phillip Manning and his team tried their hand at solving the puzzle – and talked with the owners about why they decided to open Alaska’s first escape room. Download audio

AK: What’s it like to drive a 54,000 pound DOT plow truck?

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It’s winter, and that usually means plenty of snow and ice. Or at least it did in November, when Adelyn Baxter had the chance to ride shotgun in a 54,000-pound plow truck to learn a little about how roads in Juneau are cleared. Listen now

AK: Ketchikan students focus on ‘Sense of Place’ in Indigenous Peoples Day celebration

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Monday marked the second year for Alaskans to commemorate Indigenous Peoples Day rather than the federal Columbus Day holiday. In Ketchikan, the local UAS Campus Library hosted a celebration of Indigenous culture. Listen now

AK: A Petersburg veterinarian floats his clinic to Southeast communities

For most pet owners, visits to the vet are nothing special, maybe even something they take for granted. But what if you don’t have access to medical care for your pet? This is a real problem for many people in Southeast Alaska’s remote communities. A problem Dr. Ken Hill has been trying to address for years.

AK: Recovering

It’s been almost four years since the largest flood in the history of the city of Eagle and Eagle Village devastated both communities. In the spring of 2009, a series of extremely warm days melted a higher than normal snowpack. When a massive ice jam broke free, a deluge of water surged toward the city and the nearby native village. KUAC’s Emily Schwing visited both communities last summer to find out how locals have fared since the flood.

AK: The crafty side of AFN

People have come to Fairbanks from all over the state to sell their handmade goods during the Alaska Federation of Native Conference this week. At the craft fair, you can find everything from ivory carvings and hand-made masks to mukluks, kuspuks and even kippered salmon. With few available jobs in the villages, these handicrafts and homemade foods are one of the few ways people pay their bills. Listen Now

AK: After 75 years, a bittersweet homecoming for Attu descendants

Seventy-five years after Japan invaded the furthest tip of the Aleutian chain, Attuans are returning home. Listen now

AK: Hunters sleep in Bethel parking lot to get muskox permits

Muskoxen are prized for their fatty, flavorful meat and soft, warm fur. Every year, thousands of people apply online for less than 200 winter permits to hunt them in Alaska. Or, for the truly devoted, you can travel to Bethel to sign up in person.

AK: Bear Aware

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For naturalist Steve Merli, bear education isn’t just about staying alive. The way he sees it, knowing how to behave in bear country allows Alaskans to explore wilderness more deeply. Merli works with Discovery Southeast, a Juneau organization that connects kids with nature programs. Earlier this month, KTOO’s Lisa Phu joined campers for a lesson that had some questioning their assumptions about bear encounters. Download Audio

AK: Juneau city manager: ‘People genuinely don’t have somewhere to go’

A tent city sprang up in Alaska's capital city this spring. Juneau is struggling with a ballooning homeless population and so far efforts to crack down have just moved the problem around. KTOO's Jacob Resneck reports.

AK: Quartz Lake denizens adapt to a shrinking water level

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Quartz Lake is shrinking -- the water level of the popular lake just north of Delta Junction is dropping. And while researchers try to find out why, archeologists are studying how humans have adapted to the lake’s periodic cycles of increasing and decreasing water levels since they moved into the area 14,000 years ago. Listen now

AK: Keeping the Tlingit language alive with youth

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Officially there are 20 Alaska Native languages in the state. But fluent speakers continue to decline. That led then-Gov. Bill Walker to declare a linguistic emergency last year. Now, Tlingit elders are teaching young children early in a home-like environment, and they’re finding it more effective than the classroom.

AK: Stressed Out

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This week on AK we stress out. We'll find out what happens when you lose your livelihood -- and you're a cow -- and...

AK: New “marriage” between Iditarod and politics

It’s not rare to see mushers touting various brands and companies as they drive their dog teams down the Iditarod trail. Sponsorship is a major source of financial support. This year a few mushers have gotten involved in touting political candidates as both the congressional and presidential election season heats up. Download Audio

AK: UAA’s Earthquake ’64 brings historic disaster to the stage

UAA's Earthquake '64 shows how the 1964 Alaska Earthquake affected ordinary citizens in Anchorage. It's not a traditional natural disaster play. Listen now

AK: Vusi Mahlasela, ‘The Voice,’ sings for Hiland

Before acclaimed South African musician Vusi Mahlasela kicked off his Alaska tour this month, he hosted a special show for inmates at Hiland Mountain Correctional Center. Listen now

AK: Hope

If you’re in the habit of running East Anchorage trails in the winter in the dark, then you might have run by a compact, dark-haired doctor named Joanie Hope, jogging slowly with her headphones on, singing. She is the state’s only gynecologic oncologist. But she's also in a rock band, that tours nationally to raise awareness for gynecological cancers. Their first Alaska concert is tomorrow.

AK: Fairbanks Four’s plight inspires musician’s latest composition

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The Fairbanks Four’s release from prison last year inspired virtuoso Emerson Eads to compose a piece titled “Mass for the Oppressed.” Eads has lined up some impressive talent to perform the piece next month, and he’s arranged for proceeds from sales of the production to go to an organization that represented the four Alaska Native men in court. Listen Now

AK: Sublime summer rafting down the Klehini River

The Klehini River near Haines is about 42 miles long, from its source in British Columbia to its mouth at the Chilkat River, of which it is the largest tributary. It is also one of the most accessible and sublime summer rafting experiences to be had in Southeast Alaska. Listen now