AK: Counting the hooligan swimming through Haines streams

The only ongoing research on Southeast Alaska hooligan is the result of a nine-year study by the Chilkoot Indian Association.

AK: Hope

If you’re in the habit of running East Anchorage trails in the winter in the dark, then you might have run by a compact, dark-haired doctor named Joanie Hope, jogging slowly with her headphones on, singing. She is the state’s only gynecologic oncologist. But she's also in a rock band, that tours nationally to raise awareness for gynecological cancers. Their first Alaska concert is tomorrow.

AK: One year after tragedy, stakes are high for Kake VPSOs

Like many communities in Alaska, the Village of Kake has an on-again, off-again history of local law enforcement. A year after the tragic death of a teenage girl – a case that still hasn’t been solved – the lights in the Village Public Safety Office are now back on. At least, they will be again in November, when the VPSOs return from training. Listen now

AK: What happens when a community gets running water? People get healthier

What’s it like to go from hauling all your water and sewer to one day being able to turn on the faucet and flush a toilet? In Eek, a multi-year project is wrapping up bringing running water to the community for the first time.

AK: Taking a ride with the last dog team left in Utqiaġvik

In Utqiaġvik, there’s still one dog team left, and their musher has been getting around the tundra by dogsled for more than 30 years.

AK: At Wales’ Kingikmiut Festival, dancing to heal

Last month, the community of Wales, in Western Alaska, hosted one of the biggest Alaska Native dance festivals in the state. 10 groups from around the region and as far as Anchorage flew in to the village over Labor Day weekend, to sing, dance, drum, talk — and heal. Listen now

AK: The end of Wrangell’s king salmon derby leaves locals longing

King salmon fishing in Alaska is political — but for those who can’t do it this summer, it’s also personal.

AK: Paddles

Photo by Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska - Juneau. Remember the Tlingit paddlers who lost their canoes on a recent journey through Southeast? High winds and rough seas capsized the watercraft, dumping hand-carved, red cedar paddles into the ocean. Download Audio

AK: Did Wyatt Earp really lose his pistol in Juneau?

A bar in Juneau claims it has a pistol that belonged to one of history's most notorious gunslingers. But does the story check out? Listen now

AK: The Dena’ina culture camp of Kijik

On the north shore of Lake Clark, there's a place called Kijik. It's the historic homeland of the Dena'ina Athabascans of the area, and also the site of a culture camp where youth and elders from the village of Nondalton came together last week. Listen now

AK: The unique international agreement behind the Log Cabin Ski Trails

Skagway’s Log Cabin Ski Society and the BC Ministry of Forests work together to maintain a ski site that’s remote for Canadians, but local to Alaskans.

AK: The Birdman of Alcatraz’s grisly Juneau connection

In this spooky pre-Halloween edition of AK, we revisit the scene of the crime, the site of a cold-blooded murder over a hundred years ago in Juneau. KTOO’s Matt Miller spent this summer researching what happened when the Birdman of Alcatraz killed for the first time. Listen now

AK: Silver-haired Haines athletes go for gold

Competitors in Haines are gearing up for the National Senior Games. The golden years are no time to slow down--they’re a time to bring home gold medals.

AK: Hair

Hair is important, especially in high school, but that didn’t stop a few dozen students at Bethel’s Kuskokwim Learning Academy boarding school from shaving off their hair in support of a teacher undergoing chemotherapy. It was also a chance for some students to remember family who died from the disease. Download Audio

AK: For Tlingit-Unangax artist Nicholas Galanin, first retrospective a lifetime in the making

Nicholas Galanin strives to create fearlessly. The Tlingit artist works in multiple mediums from his home in Sitka, and has made a name for himself in the indigenous art world. Listen now

AK: 2016: The year Bristol Bay landed its 2,000,000,000th salmon

Bristol Bay is home to the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world. Over 132 years of commercial effort, now more than two billion salmon have been harvested from the Bay’s waters. In fact, the two billionth salmon was landed sometime, by someone, on July 6, 2016. Listen now

AK: Ketchikan mental health clinic hopes ‘Proof’ will debunk taboos

The nonprofit that runs a Ketchikan mental health clinic recently sponsored a local production of a Broadway play. As Leila Kheiry reports, it's one of many steps in an effort to combat taboos around mental illness.

AK: What’s it like to drive a 54,000 pound DOT plow truck?

It’s winter, and that usually means plenty of snow and ice. Or at least it did in November, when Adelyn Baxter had the chance to ride shotgun in a 54,000-pound plow truck to learn a little about how roads in Juneau are cleared. Listen now

AK: Meet the Juneau couple who brush their teeth next to history

The Last Chance Mining Museum is celebrating 25 years of continuous operation. But for the Juneau couple who lives there, it’s been a permanent residence for longer than that.

AK: Plastics

Some say that after climate warming, plastic is the biggest environmental problem we face. And unlike climate warming, no one argues over who is responsible for the plastic in our oceans – we are. After researching and reporting on it, Johanna Eurich wanted to do her part to reduce plastic trash. The task is daunting. She started at home, in her tiny log cabin in Spenard. Download Audio