AK: Rising populations, threat of disease prompt renewed interest in bat research

Bats are a pretty low priority for most Alaskan biologists, but that could be changing due to a recent uptick in the creature’s population. Add to that a disease that’s been killing millions of bats in the lower 48, and Alaska might be taking note with the rest of the nation very soon. Listen now

AK: At Wales’ Kingikmiut Festival, dancing to heal

Last month, the community of Wales, in Western Alaska, hosted one of the biggest Alaska Native dance festivals in the state. 10 groups from around the region and as far as Anchorage flew in to the village over Labor Day weekend, to sing, dance, drum, talk — and heal. Listen now

AK: Cross-border effort tracks Taku wild salmon

Wild salmon are meticulously trapped and tagged by U.S. and Canadian researchers on both sides of the border as part of the Pacific Salmon Treaty. The data helps gauge marine survival rates of salmon after they leave fresh water. Listen now

AK: Bacon

This week on AK, bacon. From its sound to its smell, it’s safe to say most meat eaters love everything about bacon. But few love it as much as Erik Johnson. He makes his homemade. Over the years he’s experimented with different bacon recipes, once even using an entire bottle of whiskey as a marinade.

AK: For Tlingit engineer, Juneau bridge connects Alaskans

More than 100 years after the creation of the Alaska Native Brotherhood, a new bridge in Juneau has been named in honor of the Native organization. But it’s not the first. The predecessor to the current bridge was actually designed by a man who has his own unique and interesting ties to the Alaska Native civil rights movement. Download Audio:

AK: Southeast researchers are keeping up with the humpbacks

When animals are removed from the Endangered Species List, who keeps tabs on them? Often, the work of monitoring populations falls on volunteers. Listen now

AK: Here and There

This week on AK, join us as we travel Here and There. Take a trip down the Alsek River in the remote wilderness north...

AK: Attacking avalanches before they strike

Most of Juneau's power is hydroelectric. Getting that power to the community requires transmission lines that traverse through miles of avalanche country. That's why Alaska Electric Light and Power Company hires helicopter crews to trigger slides to prevent destructive avalanches from knocking out the power. Listen now