Kuskulana Glacier, South Face of Mt. Blackburn

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Josh Mumm, Eben Sargent, John Sykes and I hoped to find a skiable route up the south side of Mt. Blackburn (16390 ft., Wrangell Mountains, Alaska) for a one-week road-to-road climb, March 2012. Shallow snow and huge cracks prevented us from getting up Blackburn, but the landscape, sunset, and northern lights at the Kuskulana-Kennicott pass (10,000 ft.) were spectacular. Click for larger view.

End of the Alcan: Our Journey to Alaska

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Don Griffith, 1940′s. “I packed one suit, two shirts and two ties,” Dad said to Mom the night before he left Portland. He had accepted a job with the Bureau of Land Management in Anchorage and needed to be presentable for work, but had little room in the old Plymouth for much of anything in addition to camping equipment, food, fishing gear and his beloved guns. Read more.

Dinosaurs in the Wrangell Mountains

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The more Tony Fiorillo explores Alaska, the more dinosaur tracks he finds on its lonely ridgetops. The latest examples are the stone footprints of two different dinosaurs near the tiny settlement of Chisana in the Wrangell Mountains. Read more.

Dispatch from Juneau: Smoked Alaska Black Cod Dip

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One thing Juneau does well is seafood. In my opinion, Alaska’s ocean bounty is second to none. As I was browsing the offerings at a fantastic local shop, Jerry’s Meats and Seafoods, I came across a package of smoked Alaska black cod. While wild Alaska salmon hogs most of the spotlight (and justifiably so), black cod is the unsung hero of Alaskan seafood. Rich, meaty, and incredibly tasty, it might actually be my favorite Alaskan fish. Read more

427 – A Series of Black and White Photos

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The UAA Student Union Gallery presents 427, a series of black and white photographs by UAA BFA graduate Liz Shine, exploring the tangible and intangible elements of memory, family, loss, physical space, and time. Click to read the artist's statement.

Reconnections, Coincidences and “Coastal Governance” by Richard Burroughs

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Coastal Governance is an informative, yet sensible book about coming to terms with overcrowded coastal communities and depleted off-shore fishing banks. The author, Richard Burroughs isn’t preachy, commenting that “incorporating the needs of individuals for seafood and livelihoods while respecting the biological limits of coastal waters form the core of the ecosystem-based management challenge for the fisheries.” Read more.

An Alaskan Urban Rural Exchange

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Nestled on the banks of the Nushagak River lies the village of New Stuyahok with a population of 510. The village is on a hill with three main streets of houses and a school at the top. Chief Ivan Blunka School is home of the Eagles: student population 150. For a week, five Anchorage students and a teacher had a once in a lifetime chance to experience their amazing model for education. Read more.

Geese in an organic Alaskan garden

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jamie-woodside-goose-egg-excerpt The weather has been warm and beautiful, the days are getting noticeably longer, and the snow is slowly melting. These are all wonderful things, but this year the sure sign of spring at Woodside Gardens is goose eggs! Gerdie has laid 3 eggs so far this season, and it has me excited for the year to come. Read more.

Alaskan Men!

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I’ve now lived on three continents and traveled in over four dozen countries, so I feel well qualified to pronounce Alaskan men as some of the most unique specimens of humanity in the world. First and closest to my heart was Donald David Daniel “Dinky” Dunne, my Dad. Read more.

Tapered Flower Headband

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This simple crocheted headband is my best-selling product. I sell out of it at Bella Boutique every holiday season. You can’t go wrong — it’s colorful and has a huge flower on it. I also love embellishing the back of the headband with a vintage button. Read more

Ms. Camai Taking On Rural Suicide

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Suicide is a strong word. It can put a room to silence, or make the world roar. I’m one of who does both. I’m silent when it happens, but I’ll roar when I want to stop it. And right now, I’m roaring! As Ms. Camai, my goal is to stop the rising rate of suicide among Alaska Natives with a touch of inspiration. And this is my first step into a path of conquering the negativities that affect my people. Let’s stop it together. Read More.

The Birds And The Bees

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Jana Ariane Jan and John Like most young women growing up in the 40’s and 50’s in Anchorage, I was completely unprepared for adulthood. That milestone arrived on my doorstep far too suddenly. It felt like I was launched from a catapult and flung toward maturity at mach speed. Read more.

Twenty feet of snow on Valdez Glacier

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After a winter of outstanding snow conditions, three scientists drove snowmachines up Valdez Glacier this spring, curious to see how far they could get. At about 5,500 feet above the salt water of Port Valdez, their machines rested on about 20 feet of snow that had fallen there during the winter. Read more.

Frost protection in the garden

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jamie-woodside-raised-bed-excerpt Spring has arrived early this year, and although most of us have experienced snowfall in May, we all seem to be having a difficult time refraining from planting the entire garden now! Now is a great time to start your garden, with a few simple precautions. Read more.

Moose Flies a High-Summer Alaska Pest

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These creatures are stout enough to absorb the smack of a palm and then fly away. With evolved stealth, they feather-land on hairless skin. Soon after, the victim feels the pierce of a needle many times worse than a mosquito bite. Read more.

Yes, there is Color to a New York City February

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Am I crazy? It’s a sunless winter in Anchorage, made darker by minimal snow clinging to roadways, all icy and gritty. Forget sun and sand, I’m off to New York City to hunt down some color. Everyone knows unless you are headed into the woods for a true Alaskan winter, you don’t need boots and mittens for driving to Costco. Last night, while eating pizza at Moose’s Tooth, husband Dave and I sat near a guy wearing shorts and a t-shirt—yes, flip flops are replacing sorels in the far North. Ok, I need lots of polar fleece up here and when we landed at Newark Airport, we were glad to dig out gore-tex and mittens. Read more

Are Alaska Nonprofits Ready for the Next Recession?

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For the last three years, while the rest of the country was in recession, Alaska maintained some sense of normalcy. When I moved here in the early 1990s, the state had just begun to recover from the recession of the late 80's. What I heard then and since is that in Alaska, we do OK when the Lower 48 is in recession, but when they recover, it's our turn. I am not sure if that is a fact or a myth, but many of our leading citizens believe it is so. Who am I to question? When the market crashed in 2008, we published a series of articles on how to survive a bad economy. To date we have not been as challenged as nonprofits down south, but the last few years have not been easy, even for us. Alaska’s nonprofits had to adjust to decreased support from foundations and corporations – those donations most affected by a recession. Read more.

The Katmai Eruption of 1912

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This film is about the Katmai eruption that occurred in Alaska in June of 1912. The eruption affected a lot of places, but especially Kodiak Island, which was blanketed with two and a half feet of ash. Learn more.

Movement & Character: Elizabeth Andres

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As part of my internship with APRN, I've been exploring new methods of storytelling. This audio slideshow is a profile on UAA student Elizabeth Andres, whose area of study is Natural Sciences. Andres also teaches dance classes at Anchorage Music and Dance Center. Click for more.

Wild Alaska Devil’s Club Buds

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heidi drygas devils club 6 We all have our quirks. Some wear an apron while they cook. Some still drink Shirley Temples when they're 36. One quirk I embrace: I'm a forager, and I embrace my inner hunter & gatherer. See the recipe.