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Alaska News Nightly: Friday, March 22, 2019

Dunleavy goes past deadline to appoint Palmer judge; Speaker Edgmon: Dunleavy's ten-year budget plan puts him at odds with Legislature; Botulism confirmed as source of illnesses and death in Nome this January; Local residents show support after racist message spray-painted on Homer restaurant; Lower Yukon School District partners with Anchorage to bring rural students to CTE classes; Small solar storm coming to Earth but no big light show; AK: What happens when a community gets running water? People get healthier; 49 Voices: Mary Miner of Anchorage

Local residents show support after racist message spray-painted on Homer restaurant

A day after vandals spray-painted racist threats on the side of a Homer restaurant, community members have turned out to offer support.

Lower Yukon School District partners with Anchorage to bring rural students to CTE classes

The Lower Yukon School District doesn't have many courses to help students prepare for hands-on technical careers. A new partnership with the Anchorage School District hopes to change that.

AK: What happens when a community gets running water? People get healthier

What’s it like to go from hauling all your water and sewer to one day being able to turn on the faucet and flush a toilet? In Eek, a multi-year project is wrapping up bringing running water to the community for the first time.

Anchorage efforts to reduce homelessness see success, challenges

Anchorage Assembly member Felix Rivera, chairman of the Assembly's Committee on Homelessness, says funding is one of its top concerns

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, March 21, 2019

Dunleavy keeps open court seat, questions nomination process; Lawmakers, open meeting advocates criticize conditions on attending Gov. Dunleavy meetings; Dunleavy appointee to lead state environmental agency hits back at critics; China, Russia find common cause in Arctic; Foretold Disaster – the Exxon Valdez oil spill; Anchorage efforts to reduce homelessness see success, challenges; Wild dogs take down muskox near Toksook Bay; Racist graffiti targets Homer restaurant owners; Eagles fly free as Alaska Raptor Center rings in spring

Dunleavy appointee to lead state environmental agency hits back at critics

Jason Brune's appointment is controversial because he worked as the public affairs and government relations manager for mining company Anglo American when it backed the proposed Pebble Mine.

Three decades after Exxon Valdez oil disaster, Prince William watchdog group remains on alert

On March 24th, 1989, 11 million gallons of crude oil spilled into Prince William Sound when the Exxon Valdez tanker ran aground. Three decades later, the Prince William Sound Regional Citizen's Advisory Council has an important role in making sure a disaster of that magnitude doesn't happen again.
Above: Mark Leary, a volunteer for Bethel Search and Rescue, talks about what delayed Kuskokwim River freeze ups mean for winter transportation in the region. (Video produced, reported and edited by Katie Basile, Krysti Shallenberger and Joey Mendolia / KYUK and Alaska Public Media)