Alaska News Nightly: Friday, June 14, 2019

Dunleavy: Wasilla special session will be focused on PFD, capital budget can come later; State-to-state restrictions on ivory sales have Bering Straits leaders upset; Swan Lake Fire growth prompts switch from monitoring to firefighting; Fire danger is high in the Chugach National Forest; Kitchen fire sparks Fairbanks lodge evacuation; Alaska lawmakers OK retroactive allowances; How bad are cruise ship emissions in downtown Juneau? An air quality survey aims to find out.; In wake of Copper River death, officials list dipnetting safety precautions; AK: Juneau beach yields gold to dedicated dredgers; 49 Voices: Charla Kouadio and Theresa Coley-Kouadio of Kotzebue

Kitchen fire sparks Fairbanks lodge evacuation

A fire at the Fairbanks Princess Riverside Lodge led to the evacuation of more than 500 guests and staff Thursday evening.

Swan Lake Fire growth prompts switch from monitoring to firefighting

A wildfire near Sterling on the Kenai Peninsula grew to about 8,400 acres as of Friday, according to the Division of Forestry.

49 Voices: Charla Kouadio and Theresa Coley-Kouadio of Kotzebue

This week we're hearing from Charla Kouadio and Theresa Coley-Kouadio in Kotzebue. The married couple have lived in Kotzebue for just over two years.

AK: Juneau beach yields gold to dedicated dredgers

In Juneau, a particular type of recreational mining has been picking up at a special beach in recent years. Mining histories identify the sand there as the century-old tailings of the Alaska-Gastineau Mining Company.

Fire danger is high in the Chugach National Forest

Fires are still permitted in the forest, but the Forest Service is asking residents to be particularly careful.

Border senators urge more oversight from B.C. in transboundary mining

U.S. senators from Alaska and three other border states have written to British Columbia’s premier expressing concern over transboundary mining.
Above: There are over 140 landslides along the Denali Park road, the 92 mile road through Denali National Park and Preserve. None are more threatening than the Pretty Rocks Landslide at Polychrome Pass. Roughly 45 miles into the park, Polychrome Pass is steep, windy and breathtaking with sweeping views of valleys and mountains. The landslide is moving the road at a pace of 12 feet per year. Geologists and park officials are constantly working to address the problem to allow bus travel, but the landslide may force a more permanent reroute in the near future. (Video by Joey Mendolia)

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