utqiagvik - search results

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search

How a small, Arctic village found itself in the middle of Alaska’s new oil boom

Alaska is on the verge of a new oil boom -- and the village of Nuiqsut is right in the middle. Now the village faces tough choices. How do you maintain a way of life when the oil industry is knocking on your door?

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, May 2, 2019

Navy plans to be more active in the Arctic; New legislation introduced in Congress aims to strengthen Roadless Rule; Dunleavy administration pick for $94,000-a-year labor relations manager comes without labor relations experience; Juneau man dies of stab wounds; police detain suspect; Emmonak votes to keep alcohol and remain 'damp'; Kenai rejects changing local rules for onsite marijuana use; GVEA plans to highlight state's largest solar farm; Marie Adams Carroll became a ‘folk hero’ fighting for Iñupiat whaling rights. Now she’s in the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame.; Region I music director of the year reflects on teaching in Dillingham; 'The Sun is a Compass' highlights yearn for the outdoors 

Marie Adams Carroll became a ‘folk hero’ fighting for Iñupiat whaling rights. Now she’s in the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame.

On Tuesday, 10 women were inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame. One of them was Marie Adams Carroll from Utqiaġvik, who stepped into a leadership role as a young woman on the North Slope during a time of crisis — when subsistence activities were threatened — and has been involved in public life ever since.

Meet Alice Qannik Glenn, the podcaster who’s trying to get more young Alaska Native voices on the mic

If you look at the stories being told in the world, and you don’t see your perspective reflected in those stories, what do you do? For one young Iñupiaq woman, the answer to that question was: make a podcast.

Judge blocks Trump administration move to undo Obama ban on Arctic oil leasing

U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason, in an opinion released late Friday, said President Donald Trump exceeded his authority by issuing an executive order in 2017 that reopened large parts of the Beaufort and Chukchi seas to offshore oil leasing. Former President Barack Obama had protected those areas from development in his second term.

As Trump administration contemplates drilling in Arctic waters, North Slope organizations stress need to protect subsistence resources

In public comments made available on a federal site, most North Slope institutions didn’t express outright opposition to the plan. But they did voice concern for subsistence resources and hunters’ continued access to them.

Cash-strapped state of Alaska takes aim at North Slope government’s oil money

A proposal by Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy would strip the North Slope Borough of its power to collect nearly $400 million in property taxes from oil companies each year. The idea gets at a longstanding question: How much money from oil should stay in the North Slope, where it’s pumped from the ground?

Alaskans split on Dunleavy PFD repayment plan

The March 6 public hearing before the Senate State Affairs Committee stretched for more than two hours, with testimony split almost evenly between Alaskans opposed

Musher Mike Williams Jr. spending this Iditarod at home with family and dogs

The Iditarod restart kicked off Sunday afternoon in Willow. A notable Western Alaska musher will be absent from the pack.

Alaska News Nightly: Friday, March 1, 2019

Dividend paybacks meet opposition in public testimony; Proposed initiative would move Legislature to Anchorage; Alaska’s seafood industry says the US-China trade war is costing it dearly; Fairbanks city mayor vetoes anti-discrimination ordinance; Senate bill prods EPA on PFAS contamination; North Pole lake tests positive for PFAS contamination; Months after quake, some Southcentral residents just starting recovery; Sea ice almost gone in Norton Sound; conditions ‘uncannily similar’ to last March; AK: Taking a ride with the last dog team left in Utqiaġvik; 49 Voices: Katy Miller of Eek

ASRC, after backing Dunleavy’s campaign, blasts his oil tax redistribution plan

ASRC president and CEO Rex Rock Sr. said: “Trying to balance a state budget on the backs of the Iñupiat people across the Arctic Slope is a wrongsided attack on our region.”

With winter snow trails, North Slope Borough hopes to offer residents a safe path over tundra

“Near-deaths and freezing, running out of gas are some of the issues surrounding being able to go between communities,” said Gordon Brower, director of the North Slope Borough’s Planning and Community Services Department.

U.S. Air Force ‘barren lands’ survival course teaches how to stay alive in Arctic wilderness

Survival course trainees are exposed to subzero temperatures and winds that gust up to 30-plus miles an hour. “They don’t go back inside after they come out here and begin the training,” said instructor Sgt. Garrett Wright.

With spring whaling around the corner, sinew thread makers are hard at work

“Everything just falls into place,” says Nancy Leavitt of the hard work involved in sinew thread making. “The problems, the stress, the thoughts you have. Most of them just disappear.”

Alaska News Nightly: Friday, Feb. 1, 2019

Calls for 'vigilance' on Russian military buildup in Arctic; Governor's mid-year budget bill cuts VPSO recruitment funds; Coast Guard crew member dies in accident on Homer Spit; Medical community mourns loss of missing Guardian Flight colleagues; Klawock mayor pleads guilty to soliciting prostitution; Survey will monitor cruise ship emissions in downtown Juneau this summer; 12 rookie mushers prepare to tackle Yukon Quest trail; ‘Life is going to spring back to us’: the sun returns to Utqiaġvik; AK: Hunters sleep in Bethel parking lot to get muskox permits; 49 Voices: Peter Atchak of Bethel

Interior delays public comment deadline for ANWR oil leasing

The Interior department is giving the public an additional month to weigh in on its controversial plans to allow oil leasing in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Caribou graze on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, with the Brooks Range as a backdrop. (USFWS)

Despite shutdown, Trump administration continues work to begin oil drilling in ANWR

As the partial government shutdown drags on, the Trump administration is making sure some Interior Department employees continue work on one of its biggest, most controversial priorities: opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling.

Japan whaling decision may have consequences for Alaska subsistence whalers

Last month Japan announced that it is leaving the international group that regulates whaling and will resume commercial whaling in its own coastal waters.

Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018

Big aftershocks from Alaska earthquake continue; Gruening Middle School teachers pack up their classrooms for quake-induced move to Chugiak High; Reactions from Utqiaġvik on a whaling quota rule change: 'We don’t have to beg anymore'; Several Native organization want Dunleavy to dedicate funds to helping prosecute crimes against Native women; After misdiagnosis and amputation, Anchorage woman wins $21M; Former hockey coach sentenced for abusing children; Ruling limits how Juneau can spend cruise passenger fees; Human rights complaint filed over transboundary mining in British Columbia; Anchorage museum archives earthquake with viral memes, Twitter poetry; Workshop in Anchorage seeks to empower Alaska musicians

Science and traditional knowledge converge in North Slope Borough’s bowhead whale program

Scientists have spent the past few decades catching up to traditional knowledge, documenting scientifically what whale hunters already knew. Like the fact that the whales can smell, and that they can travel under sea ice.